Review: What Wags the World – Tales of Conscious Awakening

cover what wags the worldMiriam Knight and Julie Clayston (editors)

5.0 out of 5 stars A Potpourri of Endless Possibilities, September 27, 2014

Ervin Lazlo, among whose many books I have reviewed Dawn of the Akashic Age: New Consciousness, Quantum Resonance, and the Future of the World, opens the book with the observation that we are in a race with time and the cosmos is longing for us to show life and consciousness.

His foreword is followed by a short introduction from Miriam Knight, from whom I extract this quote:

” The revelations and personal shifts that people have described run the gamut from profound understandings of the nature of the forces underpinning the very fabric of physical reality, to the ability to visualize the interior of human bodies and having the capacity to change their molecular structure and create miraculous healings, to the ability to hear and even see beings in other dimensions, and convey their messages to friends, loved ones, and the world at large.”

In her own introduction, Julie Clayton observes that we are asleep to a lot of things in the world, but humankind is stirring into wakefulness – the contributors listed below are showing the way and making the point that the paths toward transformation are many.

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Sep 27

Event: 1-7 NOV 14 Manila Philippines LEAPFROG From Disaster – Resilience, Architecture, Ecology

Categories: #Events
Click on Image to Enlarge

Click on Image to Enlarge

Leapfrog From Disaster

1-7 November 2014, The Philippines

Organized and led by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA)-USA and Leapfrog Project including the American Institute of Architects’ AIA NY Design for Risk and Reconstruction (DfRR) and AIA International,  Leapfrog From Disaster will be held in the Philippines on November 1 – 7, 2014 to bring together world-leading pioneers in Resilience, Architecture, and Ecology.

More people are now living in natural disaster-prone areas resulting from climate change. In 2013, there were 22 million people displaced by natural disasters, as reported and backed by the UN in the Norwegian Refugee Council’s Internal Displacement Monitoring Center (IDMC) Global Estimates. “The Philippines experienced the most displacement… with Super Typhoon Haiyan, which was among the strongest such storms ever recorded, displacing 4.1 million people alone — one million more than Africa, the Americas, Europe and Oceania combined. (via Mashable)” In recent years, studies by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) indicate more than 700 recorded natural disasters globally, affecting more than 450 million people worldwide.

Coinciding with the one-year anniversary of Typhoon Haiyan, Leapfrog From Disaster is a truly radical symposium that will both generate and seed distinctive new built environment solutions to the challenge of natural hazards.

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Sep 25

Berto Jongman: False Flag Update – Turkish TV Staged Beheadings, FBI Documents ZERO Deaths at Sandy Hook

Berto Jongman

Berto Jongman

Two updates, both from Alex Jones.

Evidence: Turkish TV Staged Beheadings

Television trailer nearly identical to alleged ISIS beheadings

The ISIS beheading videos have led us into an unending unconstitutional war. A recent Turkish television trailer reveals evidence that they may have been staged by Turkish Television Elites.

FBI Says No One Killed at Sandy Hook

Agency publishes crime report showing “0” murders occurred in Newtown in 2012

Recently released FBI crime statistics curiously show that no murders occurred in Newtown, Connecticut, in 2012, despite reports that numerous schoolchildren and faculty members were slaughtered during a shooting rampage in December of that year.

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Sep 25

Danielle Villegas: Design of Learning

Danielle Villegas

Danielle Villegas

This is a great blog post by Clark Quinn, e-learning guru whom I think highly of. His post talks about whether there is a science to learning (spoiler: there is) and how e-learning professionals should frame it as learning engineers. It got me wondering how content engineers and other technical communicators beyond those in the e-learning field approach this.

Design like a pro

In other fields of endeavors, there is a science behind the approaches.  In civil engineering, it’s the properties of materials.  In aviation, it’s aeronautical engineering.  In medicine, it’s medical science.  If you’re going to be a professional in your field, you have to know the science.  So, two questions: is there a science of learning, and is it used.  The answers appear to be yes and no.  And yet, if you’re going to be a learning designer or engineer, you should know the science and be using it.

There is a science of learning, and it’s increasingly easy to find.  That’s the premise behind the Serious eLearning Manifesto, for instance (read it, sign it, use it!).  You could read Julie Dirksen’s Design for How People Learn as a very good interpretation of the science.  The Pittsburgh Science of Learning Center is compiling research to provide guidance about learning if you want a fuller scientific treatment.  Or read Bransford, et al’s summary of the science of How People Learna very rich overview.  And Hess & Saxberg’s recent Breakthrough Leadership in the Digital Age: Using Learning Science to Reboot Schooling is both a call for why and some guidance on how.

Among the things we know are that rote and abstract information isn’t retained, knowledge test doesn’t mean ability to do, getting it right once doesn’t mean it’s known, the list goes on.  Yet, somehow, we see elearning tools like ‘click to learn more’ (er, less), tarted up quiz show templates to drill knowledge, easy ways to take content and add quizzes to them, and more.  We see elearning that’s arbitrary info dump and simplistic knowledge test.  Which will have a negligible impact on anything meaningful.

We’re focused on speed and cost efficiencies, not on learning outcomes, and that’s not professional.  Look, if you’re going to do design, do it right.   Anything less is really malpractice!

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Sep 25

Worth a Look: Buycott – Stop Funding Evil

logo buycottHave you ever wondered whether the money you spend ends up funding causes you oppose?

Buycott helps you to organize your everyday consumer spending so you can fund causes you support and avoid funding those you disagree with.

Example: During the SOPA/PIPA debate in 2012, a number of companies pushed to pass legislation that reduced online freedom of expression, while other companies fought hard to oppose the legislation. With Buycott, a campaign can be quickly created around a cause, with the goal of targeting companies with a boycott unless they change their position, or buycotting a company to show your support.

When you use Buycott to scan a product, it will look up the product, determine what brand it belongs to, and figure out what company owns that brand (and who owns that company, ad infinitum). It will then cross-check the product owners against the companies and brands included in the campaigns you’ve joined, in order to tell you if the scanned product conflicts with one of your campaign commitments.

Learn more.

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Sep 25

Kristan Wheaton: Advanced Analytic Techniques (The Blog) Is Back!

Categories: Advanced Cyber/IO
Kristan Wheaton

Kristan Wheaton

Advanced Analytic Techniques (The Blog) Is Back!

Each year, I teach a class called Advanced Analytic Techniques (AAT) here at Mercyhurst.  It is a seminar-style class designed to allow grad students to dig into a variety of analytic techniques and (hopefully) master one or two.

The students get to pick both the topic and the technique on which they wish to focus so you wind up with some pretty interesting studies at the end.  For example, we have applied the traditional business methodology of “best practices” to western European terrorist groups and the traditional military technique of Intelligence Preparation of The Battlefield to the casino industry.

As you can imagine, some of these projects gain a bit of notoriety for their unique insights.  One of my former students, Jeff Welgan, even had his AAT project written up in the book Hyperformance.

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Sep 25

Stephen E. Arnold: How the NYT (and Google) Imploded — Bad Management, Static Content, Piecemeal Kludging

Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold

New York Times Online: An Inside View

Check out the presentation “The Surprising Path to a Faster NYTimes.com.”

I was surprised at some of the information in the slide deck. First, I thought the New York Times was first online in the 1970s via LexisNexis.

I thought that was an exclusive deal and reasonably profitable for both LexisNexis and the New York Times. When the newspaper broke off that exclusive to do its own thing, the revenue hit on the New York Times was immediate. In addition, the decision had significant cost implications for the newspaper.

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Sep 25

SchwartzReport: Trying to Kill Solar….

Categories: Commerce,Corruption
Stephan A. Schwartz

Stephan A. Schwartz

The transition out of carbon energy is beginning to bite, and the Kochs’ and their allies in carbon energy are squeezing the political whores they bought in the state legislatures and agencies to protect their interests. It’s all getting very late Roman empire. Wisconsin, a state already deeply troubled is the point of their spear at the moment. The ques! tion is will the people of Wisconsin roll over like possums, or stand up for their interests? Frankly, I think it is a toss-up.

We’re Watching You, Wisconsin Public Service Commission
JOSH VOORHEES, Senior Writer – Slate

EXTRACTS

What is not in dispute is that the utilities believe their business model hinges on undercutting the rooftop solar industry before it matures. A 2013 report by the Edison Electric Institute, a leading utility group, made it clear that forcing consumers who sell their surplus back to the grid to pay more for the privilege was a ‘near-term, must-consider action.” The group’s big worry is that as more and more solar power–producing homes pay less and less each month, the cost for traditional consumers will go up, making a jump to solar that much more appealing. If utilities wait until that starts happening, the Edison report warned, ‘it may be too late to repair the utility business model.”

. . . . . . .

And so the industry isn’t waiting. In the 20 months since that report was published, utilities have taken aim at rooftop solar (and to a lesser extent, small-scale wind projects) in at least 12 states, lobbying regulatory commissions and statehouses to rewrite rules to de-incentivize customers from buying or leasing rooftop solar panels. While each proposal is different, most share the common goal of forcing people who install solar panels on their rooftops to pay for both the electricity they buy from the grid and for a portion of the electricity they sell back to it.

Read full article.

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Sep 25

Robert Young Pelton: Foreign Policy Gets It Wrong on Afghanistan — PBI: Funded Disinformation?

Robert Young Pelton

Robert Young Pelton

There is a need to establish a truthful narrative, background and facts. Below is antithetical to all that.

Fraud and Folly in Afghanistan

The  runoff round of the Afghan presidential election on June 14 was massively rigged, and the ensuing election audit was “unsatisfactory,” a result of Afghan government-orchestrated fraud on a scale exceeding two million fake votes, completely subverting the will of the Afghan people. That is the watered-down conclusion of the press release of the European Union’s yet-to-be-released report detailing its thorough and non-partisan investigation of the entire Afghan election. The report was completed last week, according to sources in Kabul who have seen it, but political pressure has so far resulted in heavy redaction and kept it from public release.

The key point is this: Ashraf Ghani did not win the election. The U.S. Center for Naval Analysis (CNA) concluded in July that it was mathematically impossible for Ghani to win, given Afghan demographics and the initial 46 percent to 32 percent first-round vote spread, according to sources familiar with the analysis. According to sources who reviewed the private report, the top experts in statistical analysis in the United States used every known computer model of election balloting and concluded that a Ghani victory was scientifically impossible. In simple terms, there is no mathematical doubt that Abdullah Abdullah won.

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Sep 24

Stephen E. Arnold: Federal Agencies Suffering Constant Connectivity Losses — “Dark Fiber”?

Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold

Federal Agencies Perpetually Battle Connectivity Loss

This may be stating the obvious, but ComputerWorld declares that “IT Outages Are an Ongoing Problem for the U.S. Government.” The article cites a recent report sponsored by Symantec and performed by MeriTalk, which runs a network for government IT workers. Though the issues that originally plagued HealthCare.gov were their own spectacular kettle of fish, our federal government’s other computer networks are no paragons of efficiency. Writer Patrick Thibodeau tells us:

“Specifically, the survey found that 70% of federal agencies have experienced downtime of 30 minutes of more in a recent one-month period. Of that number, 42% of the outages were blamed on network or server problems and 29% on Internet connectivity loss….

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Sep 24