Berto Jongman: Peter Singer on Effective Altruism & Cause Prioritization

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Berto Jongman

Berto Jongman

Peter Singer on Effective Altruism & Cause Prioritization – this is a short from a longer interview Adam Ford did recently with Peter Singer.

Effective altruism is a philosophy and social movement which applies evidence and reason to working out the most effective ways to improve the world. Effective altruists consider all causes and actions, and then act in the way that brings about the greatest positive impact. It is this broad evidence-based approach that distinguishes effective altruism from traditional altruism or charity. Effective altruism sometimes involves taking actions that are less intuitive or emotionally salient. The philosopher Peter Singer is a notable supporter of effective altruism.

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Sep 1

Laurence Brahm: YouTube (12:54) Himalayan Consensus

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Aug 6

Anthony Judge: Investing Attention Essential to Viable Growth Radical self-reflexive reappropriation of financial skills and insights

Anthony Judge

Anthony Judge

Investing Attention Essential to Viable Growth

Radical self-reflexive reappropriation of financial skills and insights

Introduction
Beyond investing attention in attention economics
Psychology of investing attention as a missing dimension
Investing attention in interesting opportunities
Varieties of investment and their implication for investment of attention
Alternative “alternative investments” — of attention?
Reconciling varieties of investment of attention: a periodic table?
Cognitive implication and engagement through investing attention
Investment strategies, portfolios, risk and requisite attention
Attentive reinterpretation of glossaries of financial terms
Individual reframing of global investment of attention
References

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May 10

Michel Bauwens: redefining value within and beyond the money form

Michel Bauwens

Michel Bauwens

The priority after MoneyLab (2): redefining value within and beyond the money form

How can we arrive at common decisions on what is to be valued? Do we value personal bonds or do we value anonymity? Do we value community or do we value individuality? Is there a way to bridge these apparent opposites or dissolve their inherent contradictions, or will they forever be in conflict? What do we value about ourselves? What do we value about others? What do we value in nature, in work, in leisure? And how can we embed these values — both moral and economic — in the very money-form? Ultimately, if we are talking about creating a radically different society, the question of value will have to somehow be detached from money.

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Apr 16

Internet Society of NY: Gamifying Activism

Home Page

Home Page

Media artist Josephine Dorado (and friend of ISOC-NY) has developed an online game and mobile app to promote activism.

reACTor is a location-based mobile gaming app that connects news with social action”(working title, based on fractor.org) is an initiative to create a mobile game that allows users to “play the news” — players would be shown the news 1000 feet around them (or other specified distance), and then are presented with social actions and volunteer opportunities associated with that news.

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Mar 26

John Maguire: AUDIO Wayne Walton & Mountain Hour Currency

John Maguire

John Maguire

Interview with activist and economic pioneer Wayne Walton. Wayne is an entrepreneur and founder of Mountain Hours: a community-based, usury-free, alternative currency. Much of his activism takes place in his native Summit County, Colorado where he is currently working toward restoring human sovereignty through monetary reform. More information about Wayne, Mountain Hour Money, and Jubilee Shares can be found at http://mtnhours.com/ as well as http://start.hourmoney.net/

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Mar 22

Jean Lievens: Jeremy Rifkin on Zero Marginal Cost as Anti-Capitalism

Jean Lievens

Jean Lievens

The Rise of Anti-Capitalism

Jeremy Rifkin

New York Times, 15 March 2014

We are beginning to witness a paradox at the heart of capitalism, one that has propelled it to greatness but is now threatening its future: The inherent dynamism of competitive markets is bringing costs so far down that many goods and services are becoming nearly free, abundant, and no longer subject to market forces. While economists have always welcomed a reduction in marginal cost, they never anticipated the possibility of a technological revolution that might bring those costs to near zero.

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Mar 16