Stephen E. Arnold: 1% of Science Gets Published — What Cost to Economics?

Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold

No Search Or Publishing For Science

The scientific method is used to approach a problem logically and come to reasonable conclusion based off the presented evidence. Allow me to present the following question: if only a small percentage of scientists publish their work, does that not distort scientific information? Let us approach this problem in the same manner that Erik Stokstad did in his Science Magazine article “The 1% Of Scientific Publishing.”

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Robin Good: The Future of Universities Is In Becoming Masters of Curation

Robin Good

Robin Good

The Future of Universities Is In Becoming Masters of Curation

Martin Smith, Chief Revenue Officer at Noodle, has written an interesting article highlighting how the future of universities is about to be completely transformed, and how, similarly to what is happening in the music industry, curators, or those organization acting in such role, will play a dramatically important role in the future of higher education.

Key factors that will make this a reality are:

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Yoda: Amazon Treats Books and Ideas as Common Commodity No Different from Hair Curlers Made in China

Got Crowd? BE the Force!

Got Crowd? BE the Force!

Bad, this is.

How the Amazon-Hachette Fight Could Shape the Future of Ideas

While the bookseller and publisher are battling over mundane business specifics, the state of publishing hangs in the balance.

Over the past several months, what started as a quiet trade dispute has intensified and become public as the largest bookseller in the world, Amazon, and one of the biggest publishers, Hachette, battle over their next contract.

EXTRACT:

The dispute is about money, but the outcome—whether Hachette gives up on pricing and pays a little more for marketing, or not—is about so much more. Amazon equated Hachette with its other suppliers in its statement: “At Amazon, we do business with more than 70,000 suppliers, including thousands of publishers. One of our important suppliers is Hachette….” Hachette doesn’t feel the same way, according to its response to the Amazon statement: “By preventing its customers from connecting with these authors’ books, Amazon indicates that it considers books to be like any other consumer good.” But, it added, “They are not.”

Read full article.

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