Robert Steele: WIRED on London’s Amoral Tech Elite

Robert Steele

Robert Steele

I completely endorse this view, never mind that the author cites me as one of three who maintain the public will no longer stand for global inequality. I have long said that we in the USA have erred in substituting technology for thinking, and I have long felt that the intelligence profession has lost touch with ethics, humanity, and purpose. Open Source Everything (OSE) is about transparency, truth, and trust — not to be found among most technologists, none of whom have a clue what “true cost economics” actually means. Kudos to WIRED for nailing the naked tech Emperor to the wall by his foreskin.

London’s ‘amoral’ tech elite is driving inequality

London’s tech elite resides uncomfortably among some of the poorest neighbourhoods in the UK. Technology is inherently political, whether we are looking at privacy issues, convoluted tax arrangements or immigration exemptions, but many entrepreneurs on both sides of the Atlantic seem to operate in an amoral space, where optimisation, investment and exit strategies trump humility, equality and — according to campaigner and journalist Kirsty Styles — even right and wrong.

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Berto Jongman: TX Hammes on Future War — Many Small versus Few Expensive

Berto Jongman

Berto Jongman

The Future of Warfare: Small, Many, Smart vs. Few & Exquisite?

EXTRACT

To illustrate how small, many, and smart are emerging as major shifts in warfare, this article will start by examining why it is now possible to create small, smart, and cheap platforms that have sufficient range and combat capability to fulfill the very challenging role of power projection. It will then examine the implications for U.S. defense.

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See Also:

T X Hammes @ Phi Beta Iota

Bojan Radej: What if everything we know about poor countries’ economies is totally wrong?

Bojan Radej

Bojan Radej

What if everything we know about poor countries’ economies is totally wrong?

Dylan Matthews

VOX, 14 July 2014

As China and India continue their fairly rapid paces of economic growth, a greater and greater share of extreme poverty is going to be concentrated in sub-Saharan Africa. But if we’re going to make progress there, we need to have good numbers about how various economies are faring, how income is distributed within them, and so forth.

The trouble, Simon Fraser University economist Morten Jerven argues, is that those numbers are often incomplete at best and downright false at worst. It’s a problem that came into sharp relief recently when Nigeria “rebased” its GDP numbers, doubling its GDP in the process.

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Chuck Spinney: The Emptiness of Neo-Liberalism

Chuck Spinney

Chuck Spinney

This is one of the best critiques on neo-liberalism as an extreme ideology that I have read.  It is long but well worth the investment in your time. On a personal note, I have long been offended by the neo-liberal hijacking of F.A. Hayek’s ideas, especially those on the relationship of central planning to the limits of information, which fit my empirical studies of the Pentagon’s decision-making pathologies like a hand fits a glove. Yet, Pentagon spending is a subject that most neo-liberals, like Congressman Paul Ryan, refuse to countenance.  Neo-liberals, led by Milton Freedman, have twisted Hayek’s ideas into an uber capitalist, free-market, quasi-religious dogma.  Lehmann’s essay is an admirable evisceration of that extremism.

Chuck Spinney

Neoliberalism, the Revolution in Reverse

Chris Lehmann

The Baffler, No. 24, 2014

The neoliberal flight from public responsibility is actually a curiously instructive tale of strikingly other-than-intended consequences.

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