BLM halts seizure of Nevada rancher’s cattle, citing safety concerns

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BLM halts seizure of Nevada rancher’s cattle, citing safety concerns

Fearing for their safety as armed protesters gathered in the Nevada back country, federal officials on Saturday suddenly ended a controversial effort to seize hundreds of cattle that a rancher has kept illegally on public land.

The cattle ranch’s owner, Cliven Bundy, and hundreds of armed supporters had threatened to forcefully keep Bureau of Land Management employees from rounding up the approximately 900 cattle. Nearly 400 of the cattle had been seized during the past week. They were being held nearby and could be sent to Utah, authorities said.

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Apr 12

Mini-Me: Nevada Stand-Off YouTubes from 773,010 Views On Down

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Huh?

.Ranch Riot!! Bundy Ranch Protesters Tasered by Federal Agents and Attacked by K9′s.

773,010 Views Uniforms with dogs without a clue. Protesters without a clue as well.

Revolution in Nevada to Save Cliven Bundy

34,286 Views Militant call to arms including plans to use force.

URGENT! Nevada militia is mobilizing! Cliven Bundy ranch

22,267 Views White woman, “people are getting fed up” — group going into DC on May 16th.

Waco-Style Confrontation Looms in Nevada!!

15,460 Views Alex Jones’ version of what is going on.

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Apr 11

Mini-Me: Carnegie Calls for Military to Hunt Corruption – Are They Proposing a Coup d’Etat in the USA?

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The Military Must Hunt Corruption, Not Just Terrorists

Sarah Chayes

Senior Associate  Democracy and Rule of Law Program South Asia Program, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Defense One, 6 April 2014

As popular uprisings keep toppling governments like bowling pins, the latest round has morphed into a great power face-off — with Russia and the West glowering at each other across a divided Ukraine. Thailand, a key United States military friend in Southeast Asia, could be next on the list. Thousands of protests rock Chinese provinces each month, worrying President Xi Jinping’s still-green administration. The Egyptian and Syrian revolutions have spun off into bloody and widening strife, while extremist insurgencies in Afghanistan, Nigeria and the Philippines stubbornly challenge state stability.

What links these far-flung events, most of them high on the U.S. list of security priorities? Corruption. Not garden-variety corruption, the kind that exists everywhere. Acute and systemic corruption has taken hold in these countries. And it is driving indignant populations, who are networked and communicating as never before, to extremes. Around the world, pervasive corruption drives a list of other security risks too, such as terrorist facilitation; traffic in weapons or drugs; nuclear proliferation; theft of intellectual property; fractured financial systems; and governments that are enmeshed with transnational criminal superpowers. And yet, U.S. military and intelligence officials seem blind to both the character and the security implications of this type of corruption. Like an odorless gas, it fuels all these dangers without attracting much policy response inside or outside of Foggy Bottom.

It’s time to start paying attention. For, if military and civilian strategists agree on anything these days, it’s the need to reduce U.S. reliance on military responses to overseas crises. But to get there, containing military spending or constraining our forces’ missions won’t be enough. For starters, U.S. national security leaders urgently need a better grasp of the factors that build these crises. Then they must design and implement more precise and effective interactions with those factors upstream, before crises develop.

Acute corruption, in other words, can no longer be seen as just a nuisance or a “values issue” to be handed off for technical programming to the U.S. Agency for International Development. Even less should it be considered a factor of stability, as some maintain. Corruption is a problem that must be mainstreamed into national security decision-making. For military leaders, that means tasking intelligence collectors and analysts with new questions. It means better tailoring the terms of military assistance and the tenor of military-to-military relationships. And it means changing the ways that forward-deployed units gain access to territory and partner with locals once there.

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Apr 9

Berto Jongman: America’s Homegrown Nuclear and Fracking Terror

Berto Jongman

Berto Jongman

America’s Homegrown Terror

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The U.S. security complex is up in arms about cyberhackers and foreign terrorists targeting America’s vulnerable infrastructure. Think tank reports have highlighted the chinks in homeland security represented by unsecured ports, dams, and power plants. We’ve been bombarded by stories about outdated software that is subject to hacking and the vulnerability of our communities to bioterrorism. Reports such as the Heritage Foundation’s “Microbes and Mass Casualties: Defending America Against Bioterrorism” describe a United States that could be brought to its knees by its adversaries unless significant investments are made in “hardening” these targets.

But the greatest dangers for the United States do not lurk in terrorist cells in the mountains surrounding Kandahar that are planning on assaults on American targets. Rather, our vulnerabilities are homegrown. The United States plays host to thousands of nuclear weapons, toxic chemical dumps, radioactive waste storage facilities, complex pipelines and refineries, offshore oil rigs, and many other potentially dangerous facilities that require constant maintenance and highly trained and motivated experts to keep them running safely.

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Apr 7

Mini-Me: Malaysian Airlines – Government Says Sealed Evidence Cannot Be Made Public

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Malaysia Says There Is Sealed MH370 “Evidence” That Cannot Be Made Public

Malaysian government continues to backtrack after initial evidence in case of missing flight is proven false

MALAYSIA (INTELLIHUB) — Malaysian officials told relatives of passengers from missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 that there was sealed evidence, which will not be made public. The sealed evidence reportedly includes air traffic control radio transcript, radar data and airport security recordings.

Family members of the missing passengers are becoming increasingly frustrated and impatient with the treatment that they are receiving from investigators.  Many are now casting doubt on the initial report that the plane crashed into the Indian Ocean, killing everyone on board.  Family members are suggesting that the Malaysian government prematurely announced that the plane had crashed, acting on faulty evidence.

“We demand you retract announcement that MH370 ended in south Indian Ocean and continue search-and-rescue operations,” one relative said at a briefing earlier this week.

The premature announcement of the crash was sent through a text message to relatives, on behalf of the Malaysian government, nearly a week ago.  Since then it was discovered that the object they had found in the ocean was not wreckage, but random unidentified “junk”.

Source

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Mar 31

Mini-Me: Waco Retrospective – Davidians Sacred, ATF & FBI Profane – Lessons in Cultural Stupidity

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Annals of Religion

Sacred and Profane

How not to negotiate with believers.

by

The New Yorker, March 31, 2014

EXTRACT

…as the conflict-studies scholar Jayne Docherty argues, the F.B.I.’s approach was doomed from the outset. In “Learning Lessons from Waco”—one of the very best of the Mount Carmel retrospectives—Docherty points out that the techniques that work on bank robbers don’t work on committed believers. There was no pragmatism hidden below a layer of posturing, lies, and grandiosity. Docherty uses Max Weber’s typology to describe the Davidians. They were “value-rational”—that is to say, their rationality was organized around values, not goals. A value-rational person would accept his fourteen-year-old daughter’s polygamous marriage, if he was convinced that it was in fulfillment of Biblical prophecy. Because the F.B.I. could not take the faith of the Branch Davidians seriously, it had no meaningful way to communicate with them:

. . . . . . .

ot long after the Waco siege began, James Tabor, the Biblical scholar, heard David Koresh on CNN talking about the Seven Seals. Tabor is an expert on Biblical apocalypticism and recognized the Branch Davidians for what they were—a community immersed in the world of the Old Testament prophets. He contacted a fellow religious scholar, Phillip Arnold, and together they went to the F.B.I. “It became clear to me that neither the officials in charge nor the media who were sensationally reporting the sexual escapades of David Koresh had a clue about the biblical world which this group inhabited,” Tabor writes, in an essay about his role in the Mount Carmel conflict. “I realized that in order to deal with David Koresh, and to have any chance for a peaceful resolution of the Waco situation, one would have to understand and make use of these biblical texts.”

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Mar 26

Stephen E. Arnold: US Government Content Processing – A Case Study

Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold

US Government Content Processing: A Case Study

I know that the article “Sinkhole of Bureaucracy” is an example of a single case example. Nevertheless, the write up tickled my funny bone. With fancy technology, USA.gov, and the hyper modern content processing systems used in many Federal agencies, reality is stranger than science fiction.

This passage snagged my attention:

inside the caverns of an old Pennsylvania limestone mine, there are 600 employees of the Office of Personnel Management. Their task is nothing top-secret. It is to process the retirement papers of the government’s own workers. But that system has a spectacular flaw. It still must be done entirely by hand, and almost entirely on paper.

One of President Obama’s advisors is quote as describing the manual operation as “that crazy cave.”

And the fix? The article asserts:

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Mar 25

Berto Jongman: WSJ on US Intelligence Collection Failure In Relation to Russia, Ukraine, and Crimea

Berto Jongman

Berto Jongman

U.S. Scurries to Shore Up Spying on Russia

In Crimea, Russia May Have Gotten a Jump on West by Evading U.S. Eavesdropping

EXTRACTS:

U.S. military satellites spied Russian troops amassing within striking distance of Crimea last month. But intelligence analysts were surprised because they hadn’t intercepted any telltale communications where Russian leaders, military commanders or soldiers discussed plans to invade.

. . . . . . .

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Mar 24

SchwartzReport: US Prison Gulag Now a Very Expensive Geriatric Ward — Costs More than All Elementary and Secondary Schools

The American Gulag, the largest prison system in human history is now facing transformation into the largest geriatric ward in the world. As this report makes clear we pay dearly for the stupidity of our social policies — you pay dearly that is, since it is all being done with tax monies. Most of these people are in jail for Marijuana. We spend more on warehousing aging prisoners than we do for elementary and sec! ondary schools. How stupid is that? Click through to see the accompanying chart.

U.S. Prison System Resembling Huge Geriatric Ward
KANYA D’ALMEIDA – Nation of Change

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Mar 22

Eagle: Food Costs Soar – Revolution in the Air

300 Million Talons...

300 Million Talons…

Food Costs Soar Following Severe Worldwide Drought

Food prices are expected to see their biggest annual increase in the past three years thanks mostly to devastating drought conditions all over the world. Dry conditions mean poor crop production; poor crop production means fewer livestock; and fewer livestock means higher prices for meats and dairy at the grocery store. That plus a pinch on products like cocoa, sugar, wheat, rice and especially coffee have the Bureau of Labor Statistics predicting a big bump in food costs.

Higher meat and dairy prices are mostly the culprits in the United States, thanks in part to ongoing drought conditions in the Midwest and Great Plains that have forced ranchers to cull their herds rather than pay exorbitant prices to feed the animals. Inflation of corn and soybean products could be managed if farmers receive favorable conditions for their crops this summer, in turn driving down prices of animal feed as well as products for human consumption. Still, consumers could pay as much as $1 more per gallon for milk at the store to compensate for low supplies mixed with high demand.

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Mar 19