Robert Steele: Stephen Draper on Intelligence in Complex Environments, with Comment

Robert Steele

Robert Steele

Intelligence in Complex Environments

by Stephen Draper

Small Wars Journal, 1 August 2014

Four years into the United States military’s effort to counter the Lord’s Resistance Army in central Africa its leader, Joseph Kony, remains elusive. This certainly isn’t for lack of effort or resources. One hundred Special Forces advisors, a robust command and control structure, contracted airplanes, even the occasional short-term deployment of a CV-22 squadron have all assisted African partner forces to remove a few leaders from the battlefield and enable many more fighters, wives, and children to escape the organization. Yet the mission still faces serious obstacles. The tyranny of distance has oftentimes been crippling to the effort, hindering logistical resupply and time sensitive strikes. In addition to geography, this mission continues to pose many challenges which test the U.S. intelligence community but, if overcome, can serve as a model for U.S. intelligence support in low-intensity conflicts and other crisis areas worldwide. Removing Kony and his LRA from the battlefield is, foremost, an intelligence problem. Without accurate intelligence of Kony and his forces’ location, counter-LRA forces will continue to be reduced to “searching for a needle in twenty haystacks.” Further complicating the situation, in addition to the joint U.S. and combined foreign forces requiring coordination, many other stakeholders are active in the area of operations. Non-government organizations (NGOs), aid organizations, the United Nations, civilian village defense forces, even the Catholic church all contribute to central Africa being a complex environment.

Continue reading

Stephen E. Arnold: 1% of Science Gets Published — What Cost to Economics?

Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold

No Search Or Publishing For Science

The scientific method is used to approach a problem logically and come to reasonable conclusion based off the presented evidence. Allow me to present the following question: if only a small percentage of scientists publish their work, does that not distort scientific information? Let us approach this problem in the same manner that Erik Stokstad did in his Science Magazine article “The 1% Of Scientific Publishing.”

Continue reading

Eric Zuesse: NYT Dangerous Lies About Ukraine & Russia

Eric Zuesse

Eric Zuesse

(PREFACE: Right before this went to press, Britain’s Guardian headlined “Moscow May Walk Out of Nuclear Treaty,” and Washingtonsblog bannered “Senior U.S. Intelligence Officers: Obama Should Release Ukraine Evidence.” The latter newsflash is a memo to the President signed today by 9 senior retired U.S. intelligence professionals who gently lay out the evidence that President Obama has been lying about the evidence regarding the shoot-down of the Malaysian airliner, and telling him that unless his Administration comes clean on that matter very soon, and offers the world solid evidence of Russia’s and/or Ukrainian separatists’ involvement if he has any, he is going to look very bad, and that he therefore needs to act quickly to “curb the risk that relations with Russia might escalate from ‘Cold War II’ into an armed confrontation.” I can only add: It might already be too late for him and the Times  and the rest of the U.S. propaganda-establishment to quit deceiving the gullible U.S. public, but the risks from continued lying are even higher, nothing less than a nuclear war. So: they must.)

Continue reading

Robin Good: Content Curation as a Problem-Solving, Re-Assembling and Stewardship Process

Robin Good

Robin Good

Content Curation as a Problem-Solving, Re-Assembling and Stewardship Process

Ibrar Bhatt, shares some of the insights he has been been able to discover in his research work for his forthcoming PhD thesis (“A sociomaterial account of assignment writing in Further Education classrooms”) for the University of Leeds.

In his short blog analysis he first comprehensively defines the new emerging content curation space, and then he highlights

the relevance this may have, once it is validated and acknowledged, in allowing students to explore the creation of reports and the development of new work assignments in a new light.

Here a few brief excerpts:

Continue reading