Berto Jongman: Secret Deal – Saudis Manipulate USA As Iran Manipulated USA, This Time Assad & Syria Are To Go Down…

Berto Jongman

Berto Jongman

A Look Inside The Secret Deal With Saudi Arabia That Unleashed The Syrian Bombing

For those to whom the recent US campaign against Syria seems a deja vu of last summer’s “near-war” attempt to ouster its president Bashar al-Assad, which was stopped in the last minute due to some very forceful Russian intervention and the near breakout of war in the Mediterranean between US and Russian navies, it is because they are. And as a reminder, just like last year, the biggest wildcard in this, and that, direct intervention into sovereign Syrian territory, or as some would call it invasion or even war, was not the US but Saudi Arabia – recall from August of 2013 – “Meet Saudi Arabia’s Bandar bin Sultan: The Puppetmaster Behind The Syrian War.” Bin Sultan was officially let go shortly after the 2013 campaign to replace Syria’s leadership with a more “amenable” regime failed if not unofficially (see below), but Saudi ambitions over Syria remained.

That much is revealed by the WSJ today in a piece exposing the backdoor dealings that the US conducted with Saudi Arabia to get the “green light” to launch its airstrikes against ISIS, or rather, parts of Iraq and Syria. And, not surprising, it is once again Assad whose fate was the bargaining chip to get the Saudis on the US’ side, because in order to launch the incursion into Syrian sovereign territory “took months of behind-the-scenes work by the U.S. and Arab leaders, who agreed on the need to cooperate against Islamic State, but not how or when. The process gave the Saudis leverage to extract a fresh U.S. commitment to beef up training for rebels fighting Mr. Assad, whose demise the Saudis still see as a top priority.”

In other words, John Kerry came, saw and promised everything he could, up to and including the missing piece of the puzzle – Syria itself on a silver platter – in order to prevent another diplomatic humiliation.

Read full article.

Comments Off
Sep 28

Berto Jongman: False Flag Update – Turkish TV Staged Beheadings, FBI Documents ZERO Deaths at Sandy Hook

Berto Jongman

Berto Jongman

Two updates, both from Alex Jones.

Evidence: Turkish TV Staged Beheadings

Television trailer nearly identical to alleged ISIS beheadings

The ISIS beheading videos have led us into an unending unconstitutional war. A recent Turkish television trailer reveals evidence that they may have been staged by Turkish Television Elites.

FBI Says No One Killed at Sandy Hook

Agency publishes crime report showing “0” murders occurred in Newtown in 2012

Recently released FBI crime statistics curiously show that no murders occurred in Newtown, Connecticut, in 2012, despite reports that numerous schoolchildren and faculty members were slaughtered during a shooting rampage in December of that year.

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off
Sep 25

Kristan Wheaton: Advanced Analytic Techniques (The Blog) Is Back!

Categories: Advanced Cyber/IO
Kristan Wheaton

Kristan Wheaton

Advanced Analytic Techniques (The Blog) Is Back!

Each year, I teach a class called Advanced Analytic Techniques (AAT) here at Mercyhurst.  It is a seminar-style class designed to allow grad students to dig into a variety of analytic techniques and (hopefully) master one or two.

The students get to pick both the topic and the technique on which they wish to focus so you wind up with some pretty interesting studies at the end.  For example, we have applied the traditional business methodology of “best practices” to western European terrorist groups and the traditional military technique of Intelligence Preparation of The Battlefield to the casino industry.

As you can imagine, some of these projects gain a bit of notoriety for their unique insights.  One of my former students, Jeff Welgan, even had his AAT project written up in the book Hyperformance.

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off
Sep 25

Stephen E. Arnold: How the NYT (and Google) Imploded — Bad Management, Static Content, Piecemeal Kludging

Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold

New York Times Online: An Inside View

Check out the presentation “The Surprising Path to a Faster NYTimes.com.”

I was surprised at some of the information in the slide deck. First, I thought the New York Times was first online in the 1970s via LexisNexis.

I thought that was an exclusive deal and reasonably profitable for both LexisNexis and the New York Times. When the newspaper broke off that exclusive to do its own thing, the revenue hit on the New York Times was immediate. In addition, the decision had significant cost implications for the newspaper.

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off
Sep 25

Robert Young Pelton: Foreign Policy Gets It Wrong on Afghanistan — PBI: Funded Disinformation?

Robert Young Pelton

Robert Young Pelton

There is a need to establish a truthful narrative, background and facts. Below is antithetical to all that.

Fraud and Folly in Afghanistan

The  runoff round of the Afghan presidential election on June 14 was massively rigged, and the ensuing election audit was “unsatisfactory,” a result of Afghan government-orchestrated fraud on a scale exceeding two million fake votes, completely subverting the will of the Afghan people. That is the watered-down conclusion of the press release of the European Union’s yet-to-be-released report detailing its thorough and non-partisan investigation of the entire Afghan election. The report was completed last week, according to sources in Kabul who have seen it, but political pressure has so far resulted in heavy redaction and kept it from public release.

The key point is this: Ashraf Ghani did not win the election. The U.S. Center for Naval Analysis (CNA) concluded in July that it was mathematically impossible for Ghani to win, given Afghan demographics and the initial 46 percent to 32 percent first-round vote spread, according to sources familiar with the analysis. According to sources who reviewed the private report, the top experts in statistical analysis in the United States used every known computer model of election balloting and concluded that a Ghani victory was scientifically impossible. In simple terms, there is no mathematical doubt that Abdullah Abdullah won.

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off
Sep 24

Stephen E. Arnold: Federal Agencies Suffering Constant Connectivity Losses — “Dark Fiber”?

Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold

Federal Agencies Perpetually Battle Connectivity Loss

This may be stating the obvious, but ComputerWorld declares that “IT Outages Are an Ongoing Problem for the U.S. Government.” The article cites a recent report sponsored by Symantec and performed by MeriTalk, which runs a network for government IT workers. Though the issues that originally plagued HealthCare.gov were their own spectacular kettle of fish, our federal government’s other computer networks are no paragons of efficiency. Writer Patrick Thibodeau tells us:

“Specifically, the survey found that 70% of federal agencies have experienced downtime of 30 minutes of more in a recent one-month period. Of that number, 42% of the outages were blamed on network or server problems and 29% on Internet connectivity loss….

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off
Sep 24

Yoda: Big Data Mergers, Acquisitions, & Mistakes

Categories: IO Impotency
Got Crowd? BE the Force!

Got Crowd? BE the Force!

Wandering, Big Data is…

Top 10 mergers and acquisition in the Big Data space 2014

LIST ONLY

Oracle & BlueKai
Salesforce & RelateIQ
TIBCO & Jaspersoft
Cloudera & Gazzang
Hortonworks & XA Secure
Teradata & Think Big Analytics
Google & Rangespan
IBM & Cloudant
Microsoft & Capptain
Twitter & Namo Media

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off
Sep 22

Yoda: Open Access Journals — Answer? Scam?

Got Crowd? BE the Force!

Got Crowd? BE the Force!

Deciding who should pay to publish peer-reviewed scientific research

How open-access journals are changing the field of peer-reviewed science

John Abraham

The Guardian, 18 September 2014

There is an important discussion to be had about the future of scientific publications.

– – – – – – –

A publisher cannot simply give papers away for free – they would rapidly go out of business. On the other hand, an author can opt to make their papers available without a pay wall, but the author has to pay for this option. My colleagues and I recently wrote a major ocean heating paper and paid multiple thousands of dollars to make it freely available. This money came from our research budgets – budgets that are already tight.

So into this mix enter open-access publishers. Instead of selling papers, they make the articles freely available to the public. On the one hand, this system dramatically alters who can gain access to articles. The papers can be freely downloaded anywhere in the world (hugely important if you are a researcher in the developing world). In addition, open-access journals typically do not print papers in hard copy form, thus saving money on printing and shipping. But how can these journals survive? They do that by charging the author. Fees range anywhere from $100–$1000 or so.

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off
Sep 22

Stephen E. Arnold: Russia (BRICS?) Firewalling the Internet

Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold

Russian Content: Tough to Search If Russia Is Not on the Internet

Forget running queries on Yandex.ru if Russia disconnects from the Internet. Sure, there may be workarounds, but these might invite some additional scrutiny. Why am I suggesting that some Russian content becomes unsearchable. Well, I believed the story “Russia to Be Disconnected from the Internet.” Isn’t Pravda a go to source for accurate, objective information?

The story asserts:

This is not a question of disconnecting Russia from the international network, yet, Russian operators will need to set up their equipment in a way to be able to disconnect the Russian Internet from the global network quickly in case of emergency, the newspaper wrote. As for the state of emergency, it goes about both military actions and large-scale riots in the country. In addition, the government reportedly discusses a possibility to empower the state with the function to administer domains. Currently this is a function of a public organization – the Coordination Center for the National Domain of the Internet. The purpose of the possible measure is not to isolate Russia from the outside world, but to protect the country, should the USA, for example, decide to disconnect Russia from the system of IP-addresses. It will be possible to avoid this threat, if Russia has a local regulator to distribute IP-addresses inside the country, rather than the ICANN, controlled by the United States government. This requires operators to set up “mirrors” that will be able to receive user requests and forward them to specific domain names.

Interesting. Who is being kept in the information closet? I suppose it depends on one’s point of view. Need an update for Sphinx Search? There will be a solution because some folks will plan ahead.

Stephen E Arnold, September 20, 2014

See Also:

BRICS Internet @ Phi Beta Iota

Comments Off
Sep 21

Electronic Frontier Foundation: Human Rights Require a Secure Internet

effHuman Rights Require a Secure Internet

Between 15th-19th of September, in the week leading up the first year anniversary of the 13 Necessary and Proportionate Principles, EFF and the coalition behind the Principles will be conducting a Week of Action explaining some of the key guiding principles for surveillance law reform. Every day, we’ll take on a different part of the principles, exploring what’s at stake and what we need to do to bring intelligence agencies and the police back under the rule of law. You can read the complete set of posts online. The Principles were first launched at the 24th Session of the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva on 20 September 2013. Let’s send a message to Member States at the United Nations and wherever else folks are tackling surveillance law reform: surveillance law can no longer ignore our human rights. Follow our discussion on twitter with the hashtag: #privacyisaright

Human Rights Require a Secure Internet

The ease by which mass surveillance can be conducted is not a feature of digital networks; it’s a bug in our current infrastructure caused by a lack of pervasive encryption. It’s a bug we have to fix. Having the data of our lives sent across the world in such a way that distant strangers can (inexpensively and undetectably) collect, inspect and interfere with it, undermines the trust any of us can have in any of our communications. It breaks our faith not only with the organizations that carry that data for us, but the trust we have with each other. On a spied-upon network, we hold back from speaking, reading, trading and organizing together. The more we learn about the level of surveillance institutions like the NSA impose on the Net, the more we lose trust in the technology, protocols, institutions and opportunities of the Net.

Read full article.

Comments Off
Sep 20