Kristan Wheaton: Advanced Analytic Techniques (The Blog) Is Back!

Categories: Advanced Cyber/IO
Kristan Wheaton

Kristan Wheaton

Advanced Analytic Techniques (The Blog) Is Back!

Each year, I teach a class called Advanced Analytic Techniques (AAT) here at Mercyhurst.  It is a seminar-style class designed to allow grad students to dig into a variety of analytic techniques and (hopefully) master one or two.

The students get to pick both the topic and the technique on which they wish to focus so you wind up with some pretty interesting studies at the end.  For example, we have applied the traditional business methodology of “best practices” to western European terrorist groups and the traditional military technique of Intelligence Preparation of The Battlefield to the casino industry.

As you can imagine, some of these projects gain a bit of notoriety for their unique insights.  One of my former students, Jeff Welgan, even had his AAT project written up in the book Hyperformance.

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Sep 25

Electronic Frontier Foundation: Human Rights Require a Secure Internet

effHuman Rights Require a Secure Internet

Between 15th-19th of September, in the week leading up the first year anniversary of the 13 Necessary and Proportionate Principles, EFF and the coalition behind the Principles will be conducting a Week of Action explaining some of the key guiding principles for surveillance law reform. Every day, we’ll take on a different part of the principles, exploring what’s at stake and what we need to do to bring intelligence agencies and the police back under the rule of law. You can read the complete set of posts online. The Principles were first launched at the 24th Session of the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva on 20 September 2013. Let’s send a message to Member States at the United Nations and wherever else folks are tackling surveillance law reform: surveillance law can no longer ignore our human rights. Follow our discussion on twitter with the hashtag: #privacyisaright

Human Rights Require a Secure Internet

The ease by which mass surveillance can be conducted is not a feature of digital networks; it’s a bug in our current infrastructure caused by a lack of pervasive encryption. It’s a bug we have to fix. Having the data of our lives sent across the world in such a way that distant strangers can (inexpensively and undetectably) collect, inspect and interfere with it, undermines the trust any of us can have in any of our communications. It breaks our faith not only with the organizations that carry that data for us, but the trust we have with each other. On a spied-upon network, we hold back from speaking, reading, trading and organizing together. The more we learn about the level of surveillance institutions like the NSA impose on the Net, the more we lose trust in the technology, protocols, institutions and opportunities of the Net.

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Sep 20

Mary Ellen Bates: The Indispensable Librarian

Mary Ellen Bates

Mary Ellen Bates

The Indispensable Librarian [57 Slides]

Mary Ellen Bates

Sep 11, 2014

What’s the value of priceless? Special libraries return $5.43 for every $1 invested.

See Also:

Mary Ellen Bates @ Phi Beta Iota

Cliff Notes Below the Fold

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Sep 13

Stephen E. Arnold: Bilingual Search Engine YaSabe Sets a New Gold Standard — Will Baidu and Yandex Notice and Further Bury Google’s Shallow Sponsored English Search?

Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold

Bilingual Search Engine YaSabe Sees Growth through Word of Mouth and Media Partnerships

The article on Elevation DC titled Herndon-Based Bilingual Search Engine Expands Reach covers the growth of YaSabe, the Spanish and English search engine helping Spanish-speaking Americans find the information they need. The search engine actually finds data that is English and translates it into Spanish before tagging it. The article states,

“Its categories are geared toward the information Spanish speakers might need: bilingual service providers, jobs for people fluent in more than one language, 18 different types of Latin cuisine. Azim Tejani, the company’s executive vice president, says that 20 percent of YaSabe’s traffic comes directly to the site, 50 percent comes from search engines where users search for terms like “pedicura” instead of “pedicure” and the remaining traffic comes from its partnerships with media companies serving Spanish-speaking Ameri[cans].”

Tejani is also quoted in the article as saying that YaSabe is mobile-centered as opposed to web-centered. According to Tejani, some 30% of YaSabe users rely mainly on their mobile phones to access the internet. He credits the growth of YaSabe both with community guides as well as strengthened relationships with Spanish-language media partners such as Univision and Mundo Hispanico. Univision in particular has seen great success since YaSabe began running the TV network’s search engines in 2013.

Chelsea Kerwin, September 11, 2014

Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, developer of Augmentext

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Sep 11

Yoda: Peer-to-Peer Energy — Distributed, Open, Ethical

Got Crowd? BE the Force!

Got Crowd? BE the Force!

An Airbnb or Uber for the Electricity Grid?

How DERs prepare the power sector to evolve into a sharing economy platform

As Thomas Friedman reported in the New York Times, the shared economy is booming, with companies like Uber and Airbnb continuing to disrupt the incumbent taxi service and hotel sectors. The Ubers and Airbnbs of the world tap the huge value of underutilized assets and create millions of dollars of value for users in the process. Shared economy companies unbundle existing assets and enable value exchange out of those assets, with close to zero marginal capital cost since the users themselves own the actual physical assets, whether a car or a home. Could the electricity grid be next to go the way of a sharing economy?

For more than a century, the electric grid has relied almost exclusively on centralized infrastructure, such as large power plants and long-distance transmissions lines. But distributed energy resources (DERs)—and the customers buying, installing, and using them—are changing the economic landscape for the power sector. Energy efficiency, demand response, distributed generation such as rooftop solar, distributed storage such as batteries, smart thermostats, and more are poised to become the front lines of a sharing economy revolution for the grid. Shared economy solutions will help to increase asset utilization rates and improve consumer and overall system economics, just as they have for other sectors.

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Sep 5

Rick Robinson: Smart Cities 101

Categories: Advanced Cyber/IO
Rick Robinson

Rick Robinson

7 steps to a Smart City

1. Define what a “Smarter City” means to you
2. Convene a stakeholder group to co-create a specific Smarter City vision; and establish governance and a credible decision-making process
3. Structure your approach to a Smart City by drawing on the available resources and expertise
4. Establish the policy framework
5. Populate a roadmap that can deliver the vision
6. Put the financing in place
7. Enable communities and engage with informality: how to make “Smarter” a self-sustaining process

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12 simple technologies for cities that are Smart, open and fair

So how do we design Smart City systems that employ technology to make cities more successful, resilient and efficient; in a way that distributes resources and creates opportunities more fairly than today?

One answer to that question is that the infrastructures and institutions of such cities should be open to citizens and businesses: accessible, understandable, adaptable and useful.

1.Broadband connectivity   .   2. Cloud computing   .   3. Mobile and Smart phones   .   4. Social media   .   5. The touchscreen   .   6. Open Source software   .   7. Intelligent hardware   .   8. Open APIs    .   9. Open Data   .   10. Open Standards   .   11. Local and virtual currencies and trading systems   .   12. Identity stores

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Aug 28

John Maguire: Edgar Morin WISE 2013 Special Address YouTube (18:04) 7 Complex Lessons for Education

Focus on error and illusion, need to deal with uncertainty. A great deal of error arises from reductionism.

See Also:

2013 WISE Prize Laureate: YouTube (4:34) Vicky Colbert of Colombia on The New School for the Silent Revolution

2011 Edgar Morin on YouTube (12:23): Edgar Morin: Seven Complex Lessons in Education

Review: Homeland Earth

Review: Seven Complex Lessons for the Future

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Aug 28

Jean Lievens: Factory of the Future – Internet of Things (Not Yet Rooted in Open Source Everything, True Cost Economics, or Holistic Analytics)

Jean Lievens

Jean Lievens

The Factory of the Future Will Be Shaped by the Internet of Things

Andrew Dugenske, Alain Louchez

Manufacturing.net, August 2014

Around the globe, intelligent and pervasive industrial automation has been catapulted in recent years to a top national or regional priority. Known by different names, e.g., “Advanced Manufacturing”, “Smart Manufacturing”, “Industry 4.0” or “Factories of the Future” to highlight a few, these initiatives all bear the same characteristics, i.e., transforming the manufacturing process from a patchwork of isolated silos to a nimble and seamless whole fully integrated with the downstream and upstream production environment.

There is, in fact, a close link between modern manufacturing and the advent of the Internet of Things.

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Aug 21

Bojan Radej: Complex Systems Science With Wicked Humans, Smart Animals, and Communicating Plants

Categories: Advanced Cyber/IO
Bojan Radej

Bojan Radej

I am sending you pretty inspirational paper, “Living Roadmap for Complex Systems Science: The French roadmap for complex systems: March 2008, The Complex System Society«. It is written in scientific language. I am sometimes thinking about your concepts and try to figure out how to translate them from systemic presentation to complex one. The difference may seem scholastic, but I wish to point out that this first impression is wrong. There is much deeper reason which relates not only to consistency of your concepts with the nature of the problem, but it may also contribute to essential simplification and so make an important step towards possibility for operationalisation. System theory is appropriate tool for dealing with terribly complicated challenges like building an airplane or sending mission to moon. Your challenge is more complex than complicated; complexity involves another type of elements, who are not complicated but wicked, involving human and social (political, cultural) factors. You may wish to surf the web for Cynefin framework (by Snowden) which nicely explains this.

PDF (22 Pages): CSS 2008 (French) Roadmap for Complex Systems

Web Source

 

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Aug 19

Robert Steele: Smart Rats Nail Tuberculosis in Spit from Smell Alone

Robert Steele

Robert Steele

I’ve been fighting a losing battle for 25 years to reassert the primacy of the human factor within the craft of  intelligence (decision-support). Although I have no doubt this will happen eventually — industrial era technology is in performance free-fall — I am now becoming interested in plant and animal intelligence, and in how we might harness the distributed intelligence of plants and animals — including as sensors — at the same time that we radically enhance our ability to harness the distributed intelligence of humans.

Giant Rats Trained to Sniff Out Tuberculosis in Africa

Known for detecting land mines, the rodents could also help detect disease.

EXTRACT

“Rats are very fast,” said his trainer, Catia Souto, adding that one rat can evaluate more samples in ten minutes than a lab technician can evaluate in a day.

. . . . . . .

And so far, rats seem to be a promising solution: In the first 16 months of the Maputo program, the rats evaluated samples from roughly 12,500 patients. Of those, 1,700 had been found positive at the health clinics. The rats detected another 764 patients, an increase in detection rate of around 44 percent, according to APOPO.

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Aug 18