Stephen E. Arnold: Bottlenose — Hype without Limit?

Categories: IO Impotency
Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold

Bottlenose: Not a Dolphin, Another Intelligence Vendor

EXTRACT

The reality of many commercial services, which may or may not apply to Bottlenose, is that:

  • The systems use information on RSS feeds, the public information available from Twitter and Facebook, and changes to Web pages. These systems do not and cannot due to the cost  perform comprehensive collection of high-interest data. The impression is that something is being done which is probably not actually taking place.

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Dec 16

Mini-Me: State of USG IO Thinking

Categories: IO Impotency
Who, Mini-Me?

Who, Mini-Me?

U_8th Annual SMA Conference 2014 Final-1
Panel 2, Damron–Big_Data_Open_Source_EUCOM
Panel 5, IARPA OSI brief Oct 2014
Panel 5, Neuro Big Data GIORDANO final OCT 2014
Final Survey Results
The Other Stuff (Less Noteworthy)

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Dec 15

Stephen E. Arnold: A Balanced View of “Artificial Intelligence” — Elementary, Not a Threat — Most, Including Factiva, Have Missed the Boat…

Categories: IO Impotency
Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold

Artificial Intelligence: Duh? What?

I have been following the “AI will kill us”, the landscape of machine intelligence craziness, and “Artificial Intelligence Isn’t a Threat—Yet.”

The most recent big thinking on this subject appears in the Wall Street Journal, an organization in need of any type of intelligence: Machine, managerial, fiscal, online, and sci-fi.

Harsh? Hmm. The Wall Street Journal has been running full page ads for Factiva. If you are not familiar with this for fee service, think 1981. The system gathers “high value” content and makes it available to humans clever enough to guess the keywords that unlock, not answers, but a list of documents presumably germane to the keyword query. There are wrappers that make Factiva more fetching. But NGIA systems (what I call next generation information access systems) use the Factiva methods perfected 40 years ago as a utility.

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Dec 14