Musa Tuzuner: Insights of Intelligence Insiders on (Non-) Sharing Intelligence Behaviors

Musa Tuzuner

Musa Tuzuner

Insights of Intelligence Insiders on (Non-) Sharing Intelligence

Musa Tuzuner, Ph.D
Center for Foreign Policy and Peace Research, Ankara, Turkey

This study surveys the Turkish intelligence community’s (non-) sharing intelligence behavior. The factors affecting failures to share intelligence and now to increase intelligence sharing practices are examined based on the views of Turkish intelligence insiders. These insiders’ views reveal that the complexity of bureaucratic structures, lack of trust, compartmentalization, power, egoism, fear, information groupings, lack of reciprocity and lack of feedback are the causes for non-sharing of intelligence. Policy solutions for shifting from non-sharing toward sharing behaviors is discussed in a new framework including respective government willingness, enhancing capacity of intelligence collection, building intelligence aquariums, creating rules for establishing new intelligence sharing, opening up communications channels, training, and support for sharing culture. This framework argues that policy change should start first at the agency level, then at the community level and finally at the international level.

PDF (16 Pages): Turkish Intelligence Non-Sharing Behavior

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Oct 24

Stephen E. Arnold: Big Data 43 Ways

Categories: IO Impotency
Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold

Big Data Defined 43 Ways

A happy quack to the reader who alerted us to “”What Is Big Data?” The write up consists of 43 definitions provided by luminaries in a variety of fields. If you are in search of enlightenment with regard to Big Data, navigate to the story and dig in.

I found a couple of definitions interesting. Let me highlight Daniel Gillick’s and Hal Varian’s. Both are hooked up with Google, one of the big time big data outfits.

Mr. Gillick says:

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Oct 21

Stephen E. Arnold: Big Data Myths

Categories: IO Impotency
Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold

Big Data Myths Debunked by Gartner Research

The article titled The Truth About Big Data on Datamation was posted September 26, 2014 and debunks some of the myths surrounding big data. Gartner, tech research firm, has collected data on the plans of organizations for big data. The most hopeful information may have been for businesses who have yet to hop on the big data bandwagon. This may sound like old news, but Gartner’s analysis of its findings leads to their claim that big data solution’s market “is in its infancy.” The article states,

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Oct 14

Berto Jongman: Harry Bentham on Google’s Betrayal (and Hypocrisy…)

Berto Jongman

Berto Jongman

Google’s Cold Betrayal of the Internet

Harry J. Bentham

IEET, 10 October 2014

Google Inc.’s 2013 book The New Digital Age, authored by Google chairman Eric Schmidt and Google Ideas director Jared Cohen, was showered with praise by many, but attacked in a review by Julian Assange for the New York Times, where it is described as a “love song” from Google to the US state. Also addressed in Assange’s subsequent book When Google Met WikiLeaks, Google’s book makes an unconvincing effort to depict the internet as a double-edged sword, both empowering (p. 6) and threatening our lives (p. 7).

The popular internet, Google argues, might help defeat the US’s “authoritarian” opponents, but also threatens to aid “terrorism” (p. 9) (Google’s word for cypherpunks and anti-statists) against the US itself. Thus, Google argues, the internet is potentially disruptive and harmful to US national security priorities – as is the possibility of individuals being personally empowered by technology. Google laments the “anarchy” being caused by the “agents of chaos”: generations of tech-savvy individuals armed with modern personal technologies (p. 46-47, 59, 207-208). Anonymous and other clans of hackers, we are told, “might as well be terrorists” (p. 151-182).

This is fairly consistent with the ideas of former President George W. Bush, who famously warned graduates at West Point that the gravest danger to the United States is “at the crossroads of radicalism and technology.” This point of view, alongside its knuckle-dragging obsession with defeating “rogue states” and “terrorists”, places Google’s apparent value-system unambiguously within the neoconservative ideological camp. The case for “guiding” the path of the internet (p. 11, 36-39), in particular, sounds equally shy and unsustainable as the authoritarian regimes (p. 6) Google claims to oppose.

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Oct 12

Yoda: UN Explores Data Revolution

Got Crowd? BE the Force!

Got Crowd? BE the Force!

Thinking, they are.

Towards a Data Revolution

This summer UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon established the Independent Expert Advisory Group (IAEG) to provide concrete recommendations on how to achieve a Data Revolution for sustainable development. The IEAG report – due in early November – will be a crucial opportunity to explain how better quality and more timely data can transform development. The group is also looking for innovative approaches to data collection, publication, and use.

To solicit input from all communities of practice – particularly academia – the IAEG is hosting a public consultation at undatarevolution.org to solicit input into its work until October 15, 2015In spite of the short notice, we strongly encourage you to submit your ideas and suggestions for the data revolution. Please share this message widely and provide your comments on the IEAG website.

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Oct 11

Stephen E. Arnold: Robot Writers Flood the Web

Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold

Robot Writers Flood the Web

If you are reading this, it is likely that you look to the Internet for bit of news that inform your opinion on trends, technology, news stories, and the like. And most would assume that those stories and articles are crafted by humans who have an interest and experience in the field, just as this one is. But alas, we would all be wrong to believe that assumption. Robot writers are a growing proportion of the field. Read the details in the Contently article, “Does Your Brand Newsroom Need a Robot Writer?

The article begins:

“If you’ve spent any time reading on the web the past week, odds are you’ve read something written by a robot—and you didn’t even realize it. Robot writers are algorithms that collect and analyze data and then turn them into readable narratives. Many news sites like the Los Angeles Times and Forbes are already using them. Even Wikipedia has articles that weren’t written by humans.”

It is not surprising that automation has invaded the world of writing, but the jury is still out as to whether the quality is acceptable. But this also poses a question about cultural expectations regarding the quality of writing, particularly on Web outlets. See if you can spot the difference between articles crafted by human experts versus those written by a robot.

Emily Rae Aldridge, October 10, 2014

Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, developer of Augmentext

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Oct 10

Micah Sifry: Progressive Activism Frustrated by Lack of Tools — And Refusal to Share…

Micah Sifry

Micah Sifry

Transparency, Big Data and Internet Activism

Internet activism—and internet democracy—depend on accessible public meeting spaces online. So why are there so few of them?

By Micah L. Sifry

UTNE Reader, October 2014

Micah L. Sifry tackles the reasons progressive change has failed to manifest with the growth of the internet in The Big Disconnect (OR Books, 2014). Internet activism seemed like the wave of the future only two decades ago, but the Internet’s potential as a tool for progressive change has not quite given rise to sustained political mobilization and participation. The following excerpt from Part 4, “The Way We Look To Us All,” focuses on ways to create online public spaces that cater to internet democracy and internet transparency in ways current social media does not.

The Internet does not have to become one more means for mass marketing and manipulation. It can also transform civic life into something far more participatory, transparent, and engaging. And rather than just work as a tool for petitioning and protest that a few people use on behalf of much larger atomized groups of individuals, it can link problem-spotters with problem-solvers, and make everyday life better in myriad ways.

As Ami Dar, the founder of Idealist.org, a hub for listing volunteer service opportunities, likes to say, “Our problems are connected, but we are not.” That is, most people don’t know who lives near them, or what they may be thinking about important issues. The way Big Data now works, only the managers of giant data-streams have a comprehensive understanding of who is interested in what. For example, Google knows who is searching for terms that relate to the flu, and can use that information to build a model that predicts where outbreaks are taking place. It can even (and does) serve up useful medical advice for such search results.

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Oct 8