Robert Steele: Why We Need a Defense Clandestine Service

Robert David STEELE Vivas

Robert David STEELE Vivas

SHORT URL: http://tinyurl.com/Steele2Flynn

Commentary: Why We Need a Defense Clandestine Service

DefenseNews, 3 March 2014

I was a CIA spy from 1979 to 1988, leaving when invited to be a co-creator of the Marine Corps Intelligence Center from 1988 to 1993. Since 1993, I have been one of the more persistent published proponents of intelligence reform around the world.

In 2010, I was among those interviewed for the position of defense intelli­gence senior leader for human intelligence (HUMINT). I made two points during that interview: First, in a declining fiscal environment, the best way to pay for a defense spy program would be by cutting in half the Measurements and Signatures Analysis Intelligence program, which is under the oversight of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) director. It is the most over-hyped and underperforming national collection program.

Second, micro-pockets of excellence notwithstanding, no one serving in the Pentagon (or CIA) was qualified by mindset or experience to create the Defense Clandestine Service (DCS). I was particularly pointed about the complacency and ineptitude of the entrenched civilian cadre, and the inexperience and uncertainty of their constantly changing uniformed counterparts.

Here are my observations on whether there should be a DCS, and if so, how it should be trained, equipped and organized.

Continue reading

4th Media: Russian or Cuban Play on Snowden Hints at Chavez Cancer from CIA

4th media croppedSnowden Hasn’t Yet Had the Last Word: Truth about the Suspicious Death of Chaves? Is That Why US So Nervous?

The threats and ultimatums with which the Obama administration is bombarding potential harborers of Edward Snowden should not surprise anyone. No other reaction from the U.S. authorities is possible.

Click on Image to Enlarge

Click on Image to Enlarge

The likelihood that Snowden will be able to find safe haven in one of the countries of South America is fairly high.

Whatever limitations his status as a «political refugee» might place on him, he will find a way to continue his fight and to demonstrate the inner workings of the «Exemplary Democracy» and its real attitude toward human rights to the international community.

For most of his 29 years, Edward Snowden was a law-abiding U.S. citizen.

But after signing a contract and a non-disclosure agreement with the National Security Agency (NSA), he got the rare opportunity to see firsthand the colossal disparity between what his country’s leaders pharisaically preach about human rights and how they trample those same rights every day in the name of establishing control over the planet.

Provocations, starting wars, «color revolutions», lies and falsifications for the propaganda support of the fight against «hostile regimes» – all of this could not but horrify a young man raised on the principles of morality and integrity.

Read full article.

Continue reading