Stephen E. Arnold: Baidu Chinese Search Engine Company Moves Against Google

Categories: IO Technologies
Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold

Baidu, Chinese Search Engine Company Expands Into New Markets

The article on ITWorld titled China’s Baidu Testing Search Engines for Brazil, Egypt, Thailand explores the ambition of China’s premier search engine. For some years the company has contemplated moving beyond China, and in 2008 began targeting Japan. Now they are readying to move into Egpyt, Thailand and Brazil, although the search sites are still currently in the internal testing phase according to Baidu spokesman Kaiser Kuo. The article explains,

“The three sites can be found at www.baidu.com.eg, www.baidu.co.th, www.baidu.net.br and are designed in the local language of each market. In addition to a search bar, the landing pages to the sites offer direct links to popular services such as Facebook, YouTube, as well as Hao123, Baidu’s own local Web directory. Besides Web search, the sites also contain different features such as image and video search, along with language translation.”

The expansion into international waters means contending with Google, the giant that claims just under 70% of all searches as of December 2013. In the same month Baidu accounted for just under 20% of searches on desktop PCs. Spokesman Kuo made it clear that Baidu is not content to stop at Egypt, Thailand and Brazil, but plans to develop search engines for other nations too, and is currently building an office in Shenzhen solely for international operations.

Chelsea Kerwin, February 16, 2014

Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, developer of Augmentext

Comments Off
Feb 16

Berto Jongman: DroneShield Invented and In Demand — Will Drones (and Blimps) Lead to a Global Citizen Revolt?

Berto Jongman

Berto Jongman

DroneShield warns of low-flying UAVs with 18 nations demanding the device – inventor

The Voice of Russia, 14 February 2014

In a matter of a few years, tons of drones could be whizzing around residential zones, taking away tiny pieces of privacy people once had. DroneShield is a fresh new concept that alerts of nearby low-flying UAV devices in the area. John Franklin, one of the developers, told the Voice of Russia that 18 countries, including Russia, have already put in orders for the gadget and has been creating buzz ever since.

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off
Feb 15

Stephen E. Arnold: Google Continues to Capture and Pollute World of Knowledge

Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold

The Growth of Google’s Knowledge Graph

The article titled How a Database of the World’s Knowledge Shapes Google’s Future on MIT Technology Review is an explanation of Google’s Knowledge Graph and the progress made in compiling information to feed into it. The Knowledge Graph began as a database built by Metaweb, which Google acquired in 2010. The article is an interview with Metaweb cofounder and Google employee John Giannandrea, who explains the Knowledge Graph through an analogy with maps.

Read full post.

The Google Revenue Railroad: Whoo Whoo

I don’t pay much attention to mobile anything. I am nosing near 70, and I find life works just fine without checking a mobile device every few minutes.

I read “New Android OEM Licensing Terms Leak; “Open” Comes with a Lot of Restrictions.” The main point is that open does not mean “open.” Since the artful explanation of the meaning of “is,” most of the words used by folks possess fluid definitions.

“Open” is a good example. Open invokes images of free and open source software. As my columns in Online Searcher document, open is usually closed. For software, open is a way to open the door to consulting services.

Open in the Google context is similar. The monetization angle is different. Google has a huge appetite for revenue. The system Google has constructed over the last 13 or so years is an expensive puppy to operate, upgrade, and maintain.

Read full post.

Phi Beta Iota: Google is the Standard Oil or Monsanto equivalent to the world of knowledge. As admirable as their computational mathematics are, they are evil polluters and manipulators of information. Google — like NSA — is not a public service operating in the public interest. It is a monopoly, a predatory monopoly with zero ethics that will eventaully have to be shut out and routed around by alternatives such as the Autonomous Internet.

See Also:

Google @ Phi Beta Iota

Comments Off
Feb 15

Stephen E. Arnold: Goldman Sachs Web Conference Leaves Out Search Vendors

Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold

Goldman Sachs Web Conference Leaves Out Search Vendors

What tech companies does the financial sector think are on top right now? TechCrunch discussed invitees ahead of the recent Goldman Sachs Private Internet Company Conference in Las Vegas in, “Here Are the Hottest Companies in Tech Right Now, According to Goldman Sachs.” Reporter Colleen Taylor reproduces for us the conference schedule, which apparently should have been kept on the down-low, but TechCrunch got a hold of somehow. She writes:

“The Goldman Sachs conference for private web firms is one of the most high-end and hush-hush events in the tech world. It’s essentially like the Hackers Conference or dinners at Sheryl Sandberg’s house or Fight Club, except for tech executives who are likely to soon go through an IPO or big M&A deal. If you’re on the invite list, you’re in pretty good company — and the first rule is that you don’t talk about it to others.

“[…] It bears mention that companies attending this conference have not necessarily engaged in an exclusive relationship with Goldman to manage their potential upcoming IPOs or M&A deals. In fact, most of them are free agents, fielding offers from any number of firms.”

Taylor points out a few notable absences, like Square, Dropbox, and Box. We, however, noticed something different: not a single search company is represented. Well, humph.

Cynthia Murrell, December 16, 2013

Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, developer of Augmentext

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off
Dec 16

Mini-Me: All-Source Fusion “State of …”

Who?  Mini-Me?

Who? Mini-Me?

Huh?

2013 Majority Staff Report on the National Network of Fusion Centers (HCHS)

2012 Data Fusion: Uncovering Data Patterns and Leveraging Multiple Data Sources (Tuttle & Rose, PPC)

2012 Sensor and Data Fusion: A Tool for Information Assessment and Decision-Making (SPIE, 2012)

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off
Dec 16

Marcus Aurelius: Acoustic Hackers Can Halt Fleet

Marcus Aurelius

Marcus Aurelius

US NAVY: Hackers ‘Jumping The Air Gap’ Would ‘Disrupt The World Balance Of Power’

Geoffrey Ingersoll

Business Insider, Nov. 19, 2013, 2:54 PM

The next generation hackers may be taking to sound waves, and the Navy is understandably spooked.

Speaking at last week’s Defense One conference, retired Capt. Mark Hagerott cited recent reports about sonic computer viruses as one way that hackers could “jump the air gap” and target systems that are not connected to the Internet.

“If you take a cybernetic view of what’s happening [in the Navy], right now our approach is unplug it or don’t use a thumb drive,” Hagerott said. But if hackers “are able to jump the air gap, we are talking about fleets coming to a stop.” 

For a long time the thought was that an air gap (systems that are not connected to the Internet) rendered networks pretty much impenetrable.

Then the Stuxnet virus happened — an Iranian nuclear scientist with an infected thumb drive walked a virus through the air gap and unknowingly uploaded a destructive virus onto a network controlling nuclear centrifuges. This attack not only damaged Iran’s nuclear facilities, but it also signaled the dawn of kinetic cyber attacks (the kind that cause physical damage) and the revealed the vulnerability of air gaps.

It’s not just thumb drives though. Hagerott cited reporting by Arstechnica’s Dan Goodin on a virus that supposedly transmitted via high-frequency sound waves.

Goodin called the malware “the advanced persistent threat equivalent of a Bigfoot sighting.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off
Nov 20

Stephen E. Arnold: SAIL LABS Media Mining Indexer Updated

Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold

New Version of Media Mining Indexer (6.2) from SAIL LABS Technology

The release titled SAIL LABS Announces New Release Of Media Mining Indexer 6.2 from SAIL LABS Technology on August 5, 2013 provides some insight into the latest version of the Media Mining Indexer. SAIL LABS Technology considers itself as an innovator in creating solutions for vertical markets, and enhancing technologies surrounding advanced language understanding abilities. The newest release offers such features as,

“Improved named entity detection of names via unified lists across languages… improved topic models for all languages… improved text preprocessing for Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Frasi, US and international English…support of further languages: Catalan, Swedish, Portuguese, Bahasa (Indonesia), Italian, Farsi and Romanian…improved communication with Media Mining Server to relate recognized speakers to their respective profiles.”

Gerhard Backfried, Head of Research at SAIL LABS, called the latest release a “quantum leap forward” considering the system’s tractability, constancy and ability to respond to clients needs. The flagship product is based on SAIL LABS speech recognition technology, which as won awards, and offers a suite of ideal components for multimedia processing, and the transformation of audio and video data into searchable information. The features boast the ability to convert speech to text accurately with Automatic Speech Recognition and the ability to detect different speakers with Speaker Change Detection.

Chelsea Kerwin, November 09, 2013

Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, developer of Augmentext

Comments Off
Nov 9

Stephen E. Arnold: Google — A Losing Battle for Relevance

Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold

Google: A Losing Battle for Relevance

I wrote a feature for Beyond Search which summarized the relevance problems for the query “ocr programs.” You can find that article at http://goo.gl/aBDjyI. The main point is that an average user would find links to crapware, flawed software, or irrelevant information. But Google was not the only offender. Bing and Yandex returned results almost as frustrating to me as Google’s output.

You may know that indexing the Web is expensive, technically challenging, and filled with pitfalls. Over the years, Web indexing systems which depend on advertising to pay the bills have walked a knife edge. On one side, are spoofers who want to exploit free visibility in a search results list. On the other side are purists like me who expect a search and retrieval system to return results which are objective and conform to standard tests such as those for precision and recall.

The Web indexes try to balance the two sides while calculating furiously how to keep traffic up, revenues growing, and massaging the two sides to remain faithful to Google. For those looking for free visibility, Google wants to offer an advertising option in the event that a site drops or disappears from a results list. For the inner librarians, Google has to insist that results are indeed relevant to the users.

I am okay with distorted results. I am okay with the search engine optimization folks who charge large sums to spoof Google. I am okay with librarians who grouse about the lack of date filtering and advanced search operations. I am pretty much okay with the state of search.

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off
Aug 20

Eagle: Local Resilience: Software Defined Supply Chain + True Cost Economics?

Categories: IO Technologies
300 Million Talons...

300 Million Talons…

Thanks to the growth of 3D printing, intelligent robots, and open-source hardware, tomorrow’s supply chains will be faster, smaller, cheaper, and local.

Nothing exemplifies the exceptional power and scale of today’s highest performing supply chains than the simple phrase: designed in California, assembled In China. Behind that elegant phrase are some of the world’s most sophisticated supply-chain processes, stitching together networks of suppliers, sub-assemblers and logistics companies around the globe.

Supply chains today are big, complex and global. Keeping them humming is an enormous challenge. But does it have to be that way? We think the world is entering the era of small, simple and local supply chains, powered by a new generation of manufacturing technologies such as 3D printing, intelligent assembly robotics and open-source hardware – also known as the Software Defined Supply Chain.

Learn more.

Phi Beta Iota:  When True Cost Economics becomes a mainstream app,  this will change everything as it will gut those who externalize costs of water, fuel, child labor, and tax avoidance.

Comments Off
Jul 23

Lee Camp: Really? Advertisements To Be Projected Directly Into Your What?

Published on Jul 8, 2013

Sky Deutschland has developed technology to deliver advertisements directly and silently into your head. Do we have the right to keep our thoughts our own??
1) Learn more here
2) And here
3) Music by Ron Fuller

Comments Off
Jul 13