Jean Lievens: Revolutionize Corporate (All?) Learning — Beyond Formal to Informal, Mobile, Social Dichotomies

Jean Lievens

Jean Lievens

Revolutionize Corporate Learning: Beyond Formal, Informal, Mobile, Social Dichotomies

by on May 10, 2013

A report for business decision makers interested in abolishing traditional corporate training functions, creating instead vibrant modern collaborative cultures. Why? The corporate learning field is in dire need of bravery, insight, creativity and boldness. It has been stuck in an antiquated rut for too long. Full classrooms and smile-sheet summaries only indicate employees can successfully sit through training, not that these strategies demonstrate value or engender growth in competitive organizations. With a nod toward early twentieth-century innovations, moving the art world toward natural forms, the corporate education function should aim to become learning nouveau. The people responsible for fostering education throughout organizations ought to consider becoming artists. Here’s how. [Additional information at http://www.marciaconner.com/learning-nouveau/]

Comments Off
May 16

2012 Robert Steele: Addressing the Seven Sins of Foreign Policy — Why Defense, Not State, Is the Linch Pin for Global Engagement

Short Persistent URL: http://tinyurl.com/Kerry-Flournoy

John Kerry

I wrote this with John Kerry and Michele Flourney in mind, but regardless of who is eventually made Secretary of Defense, the core concept remains: the center of gravity for massive change in the US Government and in the nature of how the US Government ineracts with the rest of the world, lies within the Department of Defense, not the Department of State.

John Kerry, Global Engagement, and National Integrity

It troubles me that John Kerry is resisting going to Defense when he can do a thousand times more good there instead of sitting at State being, as Madeline Albright so famously put it, a “gerbil on a wheel.”  Defense is the center of gravity for the second Obama Administration, and the one place where John Kerry can truly make a difference.  Appoint Michele Flournoy as Deputy and his obvious replacement down the road, and you have an almost instant substantive make-over of Defense.  Regardless of who ends up being confirmed, what follows is a gameplan for moving DoD away from decades of doing the wrong things righter, and toward a future of doing the right things affordably, scalably, and admirably.

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off
Nov 15

Event: 12-14 Oct Seattle National Conference on Dialog & Deliberation

Sandy Heierbacher

Special announcement from NCDD…

Registration is live for the 2012 National Conference on Dialogue & Deliberation, at www.ncddseattle.eventbrite.com.  Be sure to register soon to take advantage of the $350 early bird rate.
We’re so excited about NCDD Seattle!  We’re coming together October 12-14 (Fri through Sun) at the beautiful Hyatt at Olive 8 in downtown Seattle for a great event that will bring together hundreds of the most active, thoughtful, and influential people involved in public engagement and group process work across the U.S. and Canada.
After organizing 5 regional events in 2010, we’re going back to holding our biennial national gathering.  Spending three days with some of the most amazing people in our field and exploring together how we can shape the future of this important movement… there’s really nothing like it.  I hope you plan to join us.
Learn more at www.ncdd.org/events or register today at www.ncddseattle.eventbrite.com.  And please share this announcement widely!
Sandy Heierbacher
Director, National Coalition for Dialogue & Deliberation (NCDD.org)
Learn more or get involved…
  • Check out our FAQs page for lots of details about registration fees, conference venue, and much more.
  • Complete our Interest Form for NCDD Seattle to let us know if you’re interested in getting involved in the planning process, helping out at the event, sponsoring, publicizing the conference, presenting a workshop, etc.
  • Consider supporting this important convening by becoming an All-Star Sponsor, Co-Sponsor or Partner of NCDD Seattle. Learn more about sponsorship options and benefits.
  • Learn more about NCDD’s events and why we think you’ll enjoy NCDD Seattle.
Comments Off
Jun 8

Richard Horowitz: On the Record About FBI Entrapment

An Analysis of the Entrapment Criticism of FBI Undercover Techniques, Part 1, April 10, 2012

An Analysis of the Entrapment Criticism of FBI Undercover Techniques, Part 2, April 24, 2012

Interview with Dick Marquise, Former Head, US Lockerbie Investigation, Part 1, May 22, 2012

Interview with Dick Marquise, Former Head, US Lockerbie Investigation, Part 2, May 22, 2012

Richard Horowitz
Richard Horowitz & Associates
Attorneys at Law
450 Seventh Avenue, 33rd Floor<
New York, NY  10123

Tel: (212) 829-8196<
Fax: (212) 813-3214
E-mail: rhorowitz@rhesq.com
www.rhesq.com
www.InternationalSecurityResources.com

Comments Off
May 24

Sepp Hassleberger: Open Source Car Created in Three Months – Interview

Sepp Hasslberger

Interviewing Joe Justice from Team Wikispeed on the Future of Manufacturing (and Consumption)

Joe Justice is the ideator of Team Wikspeed: a team of volunteers distributed around the world who recently created a prototype car that is open source, modular and ultra-efficient in just three mo… …YES, in just three months compared with the years it takes traditional car manufacturers to bring out a new model.

See Also:

This is an extremely interesting interview with Joe Justice … it gives the gist of where the manufacturing revolution is going.

The interview is in both English and Italian.

Full interview with photos and video.

Click on Image to Enlarge

VIDEO:

Phi Beta Iota:  Achieving an Open Source Everything world is a three part process:

1.  Creation of Open Source Alternatives.

2.  Creation of Integrated infrastructure–pieces need to intersect.

3.  Abolishment of political parties and governments that try to micro-impose safety standards (e.g. air bags) and other onorous measures whose sole real purpose is to make competition unaffordable for the Open Source Everything movement, while blackmailing commerce into contributing to Political Action Campaigns.

Click on Image to Enlarge

See Also:

The Open Source Everything Manifesto: Transparency, Truth & Trust

Comments Off
May 10

Patrick Meier: Advice to Future PhDs from 2 Unusual Graduating PhDs – Blog Twitter Hybrid Teach-Consult Dissertation Focus

Patrick Meier

Advice to Future PhDs from 2 Unusual Graduating PhDs

Next week I will be attending my official graduation from The Fletcher School to receive my PhD diploma. It is—in a word—surreal. I’ve been working on my PhD for almost as long as I’ve known my good friend and colleague Chris Albon, which is to say, a long time. Chris is also a newly minted political science PhD and recently joined the FrontlineSMS team as the director of their Governance Project. Needless to say, our paths have crossed on many occasions over the years and we’ve had many long conversations about the scholar-practitioner path that we’ve taken. With graduation just a few days away, we thought we’d write-up this joint post to share our pearls of wisdom with future PhDs.

First: blog, blog, blog! The blog is the new CV. If you don’t exist dynamically online, then you’re not indexable on the web. And if you’re not indexable, then you’re not searchable or discoverable. You don’t exist! Blog-ergo-sum, simple as that. Chris and I have been blogging for years and this has enabled us to further our knowledge and credibility, not to mention our of network of contacts. The blog allows you to build your own independent brand, not your advisor’s and not your program’s. This is critical. We’ve received consulting gigs and keynote invitations based on blog posts that we’ve published over the years. Do not underestimate the power of blogging for your professional (and yes, academic) career. In many ways, blogging is about getting credit for your ideas and to signal to others what you know and what your interests are.

Second: get on Twitter! Malcolm Gladwell is wrong: social media can build strong-tie bonds. Heck, social media is how I originally met Chris. If the blog is the new CV, then consider your Twitter account the new business card. Use Twitter to meet everyone, everywhere. Let people know you’ll be in London for a conference and don’t underestimate the synergies and serendipity that is the twittersphere. Chris currently follows around 1,200 people on Twitter, and he estimates that over the years he has met around half of them in person. That is a lot of contacts and, frankly, potential employers. Moreover, like blogging, tweeting enables you to connect to others and stay abreast of interesting new developments. Once upon a time, people used to email you interesting articles, conferences, etc. I personally got on Twitter several years ago when I realized that said emails were no longer making it to my inbox. This information was now being shared via Twitter instead. Like the blog, Twitter allows you to create and manage your own personal brand.

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off
May 9

Bojan Radej: Data Journalism Handbook & Graphic Map

Bojan Radej

The Data Journalism Handbook is Out

6 months ago at Mozilla Festival 2011, the Data Journalism Handbook was born. Thanks for your interest in the book – I have great pleasure in announcing that the Handbook is now live!

The Handbook features contributions from over 70 leading practitioners of data journalism from every corner of the globe, from Japan to Finland, Nigeria to the US and from leading news outlets such the New York Times, Zeit Online, the BBC and the Guardian. The Handbook is an open educational resource, under a creative commons licence (CC-BY-SA) so please share it with your friends and remix it. We hope that it will encourage many budding data journalists to look at data as a source and give them courage to tackle it, as well as showcasing some great examples of journalism using data as inspiration for future stories.

You can find the handbook at: http://datajournalismhandbook.org/ 

Also available for pre-order is the e- and print version from O’Reilly Media – http://oreil.ly/ddj-e-print - so if you are interested in a version to read offline, take a look!

We will soon have the facility to submit feedback via the website if you spot any errors or have any improvements for the next version,


Lucy Chambers

Infographic impresario Lulu Pinney created this superb poster, which gives an overview of the contents of the Data Journalism Handbook.

Click on Image to Enlarge

Comments Off
May 3

Stephen Marrin: Evaluating the Quality of Intelligence Analysis: By What (Mis) Measure? With Comment by Robert Steele

Tags:

Dr. Stephen Marrin

Stephen Marrin Post-revision draft18 July 2011. Original draft submitted to Intelligence and National Security on 4 February 2011. Accepted for publication on 24 May 2011 pending minor revision.

Evaluating the Quality of Intelligence Analysis: By What (Mis) Measure?<

Dr. Stephen Marrin is a Lecturer in the Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies at Brunel University in London. He previously served as an analyst with the Central Intelligence Agency and US Government Accountability Office. Dr. Marrin has written about many different aspects of intelligence analysis, including new analyst training at CIA‘s Sherman Kent School, the similarities and differences between intelligence analysis and medical diagnosis, and the professionalization of intelligence analysis. In 2004 the National Journal profiled him as one of the ten leading US experts on intelligence reform.

Abstract: Each of the criteria most frequently used to evaluate the quality of intelligence analysis has limitations and problems. When accuracy and surprise are employed as absolute standards, their use reflects unrealistic expectations of perfection and omniscience. Scholars have adjusted by exploring the use of a relative standard consisting of the ratio of success to failure, most frequently illustrated using the batting average analogy from baseball.Unfortunately even this relative standard is flawed in that there is no way to determine either what the batting average is or should be. Finally, a standard based on the decision makers’  perspective is sometimes used to evaluate the analytic product’s relevance and utility. But this metric, too, has significant limitations. In the end, there is no consensus as to which is the best criteria to use in evaluating analytic quality, reflecting the lack of consensus as to what the actual purpose of intelligence analysis is or should be.

Evaluating the Quality of Intelligence Analysis: By What (Mis) Measure?

Evaluating the quality of intelligence analysis is not a simple matter. Frequently quality is defined not by its presence but rather by its absence. When what are popularly known as intelligence failures occur, sometimes attention focuses on flaws in intelligence analysis as a contributing factor to that failure.

Read full paper online.

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off
Apr 29

John Robb: Techcrunch Interview on Resilient Communities (Be Happy)

John Robb

Techcrunch Interview

Posted: 28 Apr 2012 10:15 AM PDT

I did an interview the Jon Evans at Techcrunch (the social technology hub) earlier this week.  Here it is.

I’m spending most of my time writing and editing the Resilient Communities letter (it’s free to subscribe).

As I said in the interview, the reason I started the letter was because I strongly believe that the most successful, happiest people on the planet in twenty years will be living in resilient communities.

Lots of good stuff in the RC letter —  from DiY sewage systems to how to power an entire neighborhood with solar energy.

Phi Beta Iota:  Creating resilient communities from the bottom up is what the federal government should be but is not facilitating.  We’re on our own.

See Also:

Paul and Percival Goodman, Communitas: Means of Livelihood and Ways of Life (Columbia University Press, 1990)

Kirkpatrick Sale, Human Scale (New Catalyst Books, 2007)

E. F. Schumaker, Small Is Beautiful: Economics as if People Mattered (Hartley and Marks Publishers, 2000)

Comments Off
Apr 29

DefDog: Counter-IED Network Analysis – Works for Law Enforcement, Ignored by US Military

DefDog

When we worked on the Manhunting Project for SOCOM, the US Marshall’s Service said that fugitive hunting was all about network analysis. The IC doesn’t understand network analysis as the bean counters push for numbers….they focus on low hanging fruit and as a result there is always some guy out there ready to step up and take the foot soldier’s place (not so much the upper echelons). Try to tell an IC drone that it is all about the network and you will get a deer in the headlight look….

The REAL Jack Bauer

Contributor:  Louis DeAnda

Police forces have spent decades combating organised crime with well-practised techniques, but can the same tactics be the key to defeating insurgencies on the front line? Former police officer, federal marshal, and JIEDDO FOX team member Louis J. DeAnda tells Defence IQ how we need to take a holistic strategy to IED network attack…

Phi Beta Iota:  Completely apart from the corruption at the top of both the Department of Justice and the Department of Defense, this is an extraordinary–a gifted–contribution to the literature.  It is reproduced in full below the line to preserve it as a reference.

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off
Apr 24