Jean Lievens: Build Your Own Micro-Factory — Freedom Through Inexpensive Open Source Everything

Categories: Manufacturing
Jean Lievens

Jean Lievens

Build Your Own Micro-Factory (It’s Cheaper Than You Think)

EXTRACT

At the root of Gershenfeld’s course is a list of machines. These are not exotic, multi-million dollar machines, although you can certainly spend a pretty penny on the top end models in each category. Rather, these devices, with the possible exception of the 3d printer are all fairly well known quantities. Gershenfeld’s Fabrication Laboratory (Fab-Lab, for short), networks these various machines and makes them work together. He does that in a space about the size of a two-car garage.

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Oct 26

Sepp Hassberger: 3-D Printed Open Source Roadster

Sepp Hasslberger

Sepp Hasslberger

Can local manufacturing compete with automobile mass production? It seems that yes, it can. The technology will improve as time goes on and you can’t beat the price…

3-D Printed Car: NY Daily News Autos gets a ride in the Local Motors “Strati” 3-D printed roadster

The world’s first 3-D printed car is now a reality, and the Daily News Autos got to ride in the car of the future on the streets of Brooklyn, New York. Engineered and built by Phoenix-based Local Motors, the 2-passenger roadster, called the “Strati,” can be printed in 44 hours and has a top speed of approximately 50 mph.

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Click on Image to Enlarge

EXTRACT

“This is about simplification and streamlining,” explains Jay Rogers, co-founder and CEO of Local Motors. Rogers was present to give us a tour of the Strati and explain, exactly, 3-D printing tech brings to the automotive world. “All this material you’re looking at,” he says, pointing to the car, “is about $3,500 dollars.”

. . . . . . .

Granted, it’s not pretty, but the prototypes ridged edges can be smoothed over with human-powered grinding and sanding. Paint can also be applied to the body-work, though this negates the Strati’s near 100-percent recyclability.

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Oct 10

Jean Lievens: fab labs, open innovation and smart cities

Jean Lievens

Jean Lievens

4/4 Fabbing & cities: Barcelona Fab City

This post is the fourth of 4 posts about Digital manufacturing (fabbing) environments that we have been publishing weekly on Fridays. In these posts I have shared my research on fab labs, open innovation and smart cities, mainly in Europe and in Spain.

The fourth post is the result of a research on fab labs and their relationship with smartcities. In the last two articles I have written about two recent nodes of the global fab lab network. Although there are other fablabs in Spain, I decided to give visibility to these two initiatives in León and in Sevilla. Among all fab labs in Spain those two are giving a real opportunity to make personal production and digital manufacturing accessible and comprehensible for a wide range of people. However, the most popular manufacturing laboratory in Spain is Fab Lab Barcelona (2008). It is settled in the IAAC – Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia and it is part of the Fab Lab Network. I would like to share my interest in their research on how the digital production ecosystem could make our cities smarter.

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Oct 3

Graphic: Embedded Intelligence — Adding Open Source Everything (Engineering Intelligence), True Cost Economics (Supply Intelligence) and Holistic Analytics (Demand Intelligence)

Enhanced Graphic:

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Click on Image to Enlarge

Source: Robert David Steele

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Aug 15

Sepp Hasslberger: How a Dutch team of architects is 3D-printing a full-sized house in Amsterdam (video 4 min)

Sepp Hasslberger

Sepp Hasslberger

3D printing is growing up!

How a Dutch team of architects is 3D-printing a full-sized house in Amsterdam (video 4 min)

Architects in Amsterdam have started building what they say is one of the world’s first full-sized 3D-printed houses. The structure is being built using a plastic heavily based on plant oil. The team behind the house claim it is a waste-free, eco-friendly way to design and construct the cities of the future.

VIDEO

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May 4

Jean Lievens: Open Source Urbanism & “Right to Infrastructure”

Jean Lievens

Jean Lievens

The right to infrastructure: a prototype for open source urbanism

Alberto Corsín Jiménez

Abstract. This paper develops an analytical framework to place the rise of open source urbanism in context, and develops the concept of the ‘right to infrastructure’ as expressive of new ecologies of urban relations that have come into being. It describes, first, a genealogy for open source technology, focusing in particular on how open source urban hardware projects may challenge urban theory. It moves then to describe in detail various dimensions and implications of an open source infrastructural project in Madrid. In all, the paper analyses three challenges that the development of open source urban infrastructures is posing to the institutions of urban governance and property: the evolving shape and composition of urban ecologies; the technical and design challenges brought about by open source urban projects; and the social organisation of the ‘right to infrastructure’ as a political, active voice in urban governance. In the last instance, the right to infrastructure, I shall argue, signals the rise of the ‘prototype’ as an emerging figure for contemporary sociotechnical designs in and for social theory.
Keywords: open source urbanism, infrastructures, urban ecologies, urban commons, right to the city, prototypes

Corsín Jiménez A, 2014, “The right to infrastructure: a prototype for open source urbanism” Environment and Planning D: Society and Space 32(2) 342 – 362

PDF (21 Pages): 2014 Open Source Urbanism Right to Infrastructure

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Apr 28

Jean Lievens: Robot Can Print House in 24 Hours

The world’s largest concentrations of slums exist in the “global south:” Africa, Asia, and Latin America; places where urbanization has not led to economic development, and are characterized by poor sanitation, crowded living conditions, low quality structures, and populations vulnerable to disease and natural disasters.

Robot Printing House in 24 Hours

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Click on Image to Enlarge

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Feb 6