Daniel Villegas: PiPhone: A DIY Rasberry Pi Cellphone — in the OpenBTS Tradition!

Danielle Villegas

Danielle Villegas

This is one of those fun things that as a geek mom, I had to share. I also think it’s a cool project to do if you have the parts. This is the sort of thing I would’ve loved to have done as a kid. (I do want to get my hands on a Raspberry Pi at some point!) Watch the video in the article. It’s not practical, but it’s still pretty cool. 

PiPhone: A DIY Raspberry Pi Cellphone

Matt Richardson

Makezine.com, 29 April 2014

Click on Image to Enlarge

Click on Image to Enlarge

When the Raspberry Pi Compute Module was announced ealier this month, a group of us at MAKE discussed what kind of impact it could have. For one, we thought perhaps it could help foster the rise of DIY electronics such as cameras, cellphones, and laptops.

Even without the Compute Module, software engineer and Raspberry Pi enthusiast Dave Hunt made a lot of headway with his own Raspberry Pi-based cellphone. By sandwiching together a Raspberry Pi Model B, TFT touch screen, a lithium polymer battery, and GSM module, Dave has cobbled together a portable GSM phone that can place calls with a headset.

“It’s more of a proof of concept to see what could be done with a relatively small form factor with off-the-shelf (cheap) components,” Dave says. “I don’t expect everyone to be rushing out to build this one, but I had great fun in doing it, as it builds quite nicely on my previous projects.” The total cost of the PiPhone project? Just $158, no contract required! See it in action below:



See Also:

OpenBTS @ Phi Beta Iota

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Apr 30

Stephen E. Arnold: Replicant Hopes to Free Mobile from the Tyranny of Proprietary Software

Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold

Replicant Hopes to Free Mobile from the Tyranny of Proprietary Software

August 27, 2013

Citing freedom and security concerns, the makers of Replicant are calling for donations, we learn from “Fundraising a Fully Free Fork of Android” at Boing Boing. The project hopes to give us all the choice to run our Android-based mobile devices entirely upon free software.

But wait, you ask, isn’t Android is already open source? Well, most of it, but a few “key non-free parts” keep our Android devices tethered to proprietary programs. Such parts, they say, include the layer that communicates with hardware; yes, that would be pretty important.

Also of concern to Replicant developers are the pre-loaded applications that some of us call “bloatware,” but upon which many users have come to rely. The team plans to develop free software that provides the same functionality. (I hope they also include the option to delete applications without them returning uninvited. That would be a nice change.) Furthermore, they have set up rival to the Google Play store, their app repository called F-Droid. That repository, the article notes, works with all Android-based systems.

The write-up summarizes:

“Mobile operating systems distributed by Apple, Microsoft, and Google all require you to use proprietary software. Even one such program in a phone’s application space is enough to threaten our freedom and security — it only takes one open backdoor to gain access. We are proud to support the Replicant project to help users escape the proprietary restrictions imposed by the current major smartphone vendors. There will still be problems remaining to solve, like the proprietary radio firmware and the common practice of locking down phones, but Replicant is a major part of the solution.”

Replicant is underpinned by copyrighted software that has been released under an assortment of free licenses, which their site links to here. This is an interesting initiative, and we have a couple of questions should it be successful: Will Google’s mobile search revenues come under increased pressure? What happens if Samsung or the Chinese mobile manufacturers jump on this variant of Android? We shall see.

Cynthia Murrell, August 27, 2013

Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, developer of Augmentext

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Aug 27

Mini-Me: Give Every Afghan a Radio? Or Give Every Afghan OpenBTS with a Radio App? + OpenBTS Meta-RECAP

Who?  Mini-Me?

Who? Mini-Me?

Huh?

Overheard in the World Cafe:

Speaker A:  My friend is creating a wide-area radio network for Afghanistan.

Speaker B:  Afghanistan has no infrastructure — including radio stations.  Although radio is popular, it is mostly shortwave, with a few local FM stations for the local Iman.  And electricity for radio stations is spotty at best including in Kabul.

Speaker A:  Well, I can build really cheap, “ultra” cheap, radio receivers.

Speaker B:  As long as you are doing that, why not give them OpenBTS cell phones running on ambient energy, and include a radio app?  Then get someone else — Google, Virgin Mobile, the Chinese or India — to focus on all-purpose cellular towers and tethered ballons?

Read the rest of this entry »

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Aug 4

John Maguire: YouTube (3:26) DIY Open Source Cell Phones & Mesh Telephony

John Maguire

John Maguire

It’s happening! Should spread like wildfire once it passes a natural tipping point.

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Jun 1

Graphic: Ugly First Look at Hand-Held Device Value for Harvesting Monetizable Knowledge

Click on Image to Enlarge

Click on Image to Enlarge

Slide:  Cellular Value Chart

Phi Beta Iota:  Open Source Everything (OSE) begins with OpenBTS (Base Transceiver Station, i.e. a hand-held cell phone).

See Also:

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May 23

John Maguire: YouTube (15:09) Wireless Scalar Wave Demonstration — and Potential Chinese Harvesting Method – NSA is HOSED

John Maguire

John Maguire

Tesla technologies can revolutionize communications as we know them today. here is demonstrated one example where it outperforms standard electro-magnetic or transverse wave propagation.

A German Electrical Engineer operating under the pseudonym TheOldScientist demonstrates the existence of Longitudinal/Scalar Waves. Classical Electromagnetic-Waves are Transverse and can be shielded through the use of a Faraday Cage. L/S Waves on the other hand bypass all manner of barriers, and have been shown to propagate at superluminal speeds as well. Proper utilization of S/L Waves can open up broad vistas for communications technologies as well as eliminate electro-smog (a byproduct of unharnessed scalar-pollution currently produced by traditional EM-technologies).

See Also:

Read the rest of this entry »

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May 5

SmartPlanet: The $10 Cell Phone Has Arrived….Plus Open Cell Meta-RECAP

smartplanet logoThe $10 cell phone has arrived – and with it, economic opportunity

By | March 18, 2013, 3:10 AM PDT

On a recent trip to Shenzhen, China, a group of MIT students discovered that you can buy a cell phone there for as little as $10. While the cost of mobile phones has continued to decrease over time, the fact that you can buy a gadget that can make phone calls and send text messages (and has a working battery) for that price is pretty astonishing. The head of MIT’s Media Lab, Joi Ito, reckons that these are likely the world’s cheapest phones.

A $10 price tag means that virtually anyone in the world can afford a mobile phone. Moreover, in parts of the world where basic phones are still more predominant than the “smart” variety gaining steam in the developed world, local infrastructure makes these gadgets more powerful than even smartphones in rich countries.

In Kenya, more than 30 percent of its GDP is fueled by M-Pesa, a mobile payments system that operates via text message. (See a video about M-Pesa here.) Though they may make life easier, smartphones in developed countries have not yet become anywhere near as important to driving economic growth.

Despite the rapid proliferation of smartphones in many countries, basic mobile phones still account for the majority of those used around the world. And given the tremendous economic possibilities for mobile payment systems to create economic growth, perhaps the most basic, cheapest cell phone might make it the world’s most useful.

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Mar 18

John Steiner: THE GLOBAL MARCH TOWARD PEACE by Gareth Evans*

John Steiner

John Steiner

A starting point for the new Secretaries of State and Defense.

THE GLOBAL MARCH TOWARD PEACE

by

Gareth Evans, Australia’s foreign minister for eight years and President Emeritus of the International Crisis Group, is currently Chancellor of the Australian National University and co-chair of the Global Center for the Responsibility to Protect. As Foreign Minister, he was at the forefront of recasting Australia’s relationship with China, India, and Indonesia, while deepening its alliance with the US, and helped found the APEC and ASEAN security forums. He also played a leading role in bringing peace to Cambodia and negotiating the International Convention on Chemical Weapons, and is the principal framer of the United Nations’ “responsibility to protect” doctrine.

Project Syndicate, 27 December 2012

CANBERRA – If we were hoping for peace in our time, 2012 did not deliver it. Conflict grew ever bloodier in Syria, continued to grind on in Afghanistan, and flared up periodically in West, Central, and East Africa. There were multiple episodes of ethnic, sectarian, and politically motivated violence in Myanmar (Burma), South Asia, and around the Middle East. Tensions between China and its neighbors have escalated in the South China Sea, and between China and Japan in the East China Sea. Concerns about North Korea’s and Iran’s nuclear programs remain unresolved.

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Jan 5

SmartPlanet: $41 Tablet for India

smartplanet logoThe world’s cheapest tablet, improved (and reviewed)

By Betwa Sharma | December 31, 2012,

Click on Image to Enlarge

Click on Image to Enlarge

DELHI — In 2012, SmartPlanet reported on a series of inexpensive tablets from India especially the $41 one called Aakash, which was launched by the Indian government.

Datawind Inc., a Montreal-based tech company, made the tablet in response to the Indian government’s challenge to create the world’s cheapest tablet.

Aakash, which was further subsidized for students to $35, received bad reviews. Critics said it had poor battery life, an unresponsive screen, absence of useful apps, less storage space and a slow processor.

In November, Datawind relaunched its tablet as Aakash 2. The improved tablet is powered by Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich run on 1 GHz processor and 512 MB RAM with 4 GB internal storage and 32 GB microSD support. Its basic features include 7-inch capacitative touch screen, battery life of three hours, 0.3 megapixel front camera and WiFi connectivity.

The Indian government will buy about 100,000 units from Datawind for Rs. 2263 ($41) and make it available to students for Rs.1130 ($20). The commercial version of the tablet can be bought online for Rs. 4499 ($81)

This time, it was launched not only in India but also unveiled at the United Nations.

“India is a critical player on security issues … but you are also a leader on development and technology,” U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said at the unveiling in November. “Indeed, India is a superpower on the information superhighway.”

“We need to do more to help all children and young people make the most of the opportunities provided by information and communications technology – especially all those who are still unconnected from the digital revolution,” he added.

SmartPlanet spoke with tech expert Prasnato Roy, editorial adviser at CyberMedia India, on what’s new with the tablet and will it work better.

Read full article with interview.

Phi Beta Iota: Combine with with Open Cloud and Open Spectrum, among other opens, and we create a prosperous world at peace, a world that works for all.

See Also:

21st Century Intelligence Core References 2.8

Owl: $20 Table Storms the World — Four Million Back Ordered

Search: openbts [as of 30 Oct 2012]

SmartPlanet: Mobile Phones Lifting Global Economy

 

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Dec 31

Michel Bauwens: Ericsson Document on Learning and Education in a Networked Society

Michel Bauwens

Michel Bauwens

We are on the brink of a fundamental shift in society. As we journey towards the Networked Society we are unlocking the full potential of learning and education. Students and progressive teachers, empowered by technology, are turning established models on their heads while new skills and educational platforms are redefining our systems and institutions.

Contents:
1 A connected world 4
2 From evolution to revolution 5
3 Classroom disruption 6
Breaking down the walls 6
Knowledge everywhere 6
Lifelong learning 7
The empowered classroom 7
4 The science of change 8
5 Making the grade 10

Learning and Education in a Networked Society (PDF 12 Pages)

Phi Beta Iota:  An Ericsson document.  Most interesting point: mobile traffic expected to grow by fifteen times before 2017.  Most absent word: “open.”

See Also:

Open BTS (Base Transciever Station) (5)

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Dec 18