Stephen E. Arnold: Elastisearch Open Source Rules Search — Bulldozing Content Processing

Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold

Elasticsearch: Bulldozing Content Processing

When I left the intelligence conference in Prague, there were a number of companies in my graphic about open source search. When I got off the airplane, I edited my slide. Looks to me as if Elasticsearch has just bulldozed the search and content sector, commercialized open source group. I would not want to be the CEO of LucidWorks, Ikanow, or any other open sourcey search and content processing company this weekend.

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Sepp Hasslberger: IndieBox Open Source Hardware Lets You Take Your Data Back from Google and Do CISCO-Like Rule-Making Without CISCO

Sepp Hasslberger

Sepp Hasslberger

We are finally seeing the de-centralized internet coming together.  Lots of people are working on this, both on software and hardware (like this computer/personal server) to make it a reality.

Out in the Open: The Tiny Box That Lets You Take Your Data Back From Google | Enterprise | WIRED

From www.wired.com May 14, 9:54 AM

For open source developer Johannes Ernst, what the world really needs is a simple device that anyone can use to take their data back from the wilds of the internet.

Click on Image to Enlarge

Click on Image to Enlarge

So he designed the Indie Box, a personal web server preloaded with open source software that lets you run your own web services from your home network–and run them with relative ease.

You can’t buy an Indie Box yet, but you can pre-order one through the crowdfunding site Indie GoGo.

The first Indie Box will run off an Intel Atom processor, 2GB of RAM, and two 1TB hard drives that mirror each other to help protect your data.

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Richard Stallman: FSF condemns partnership between Mozilla and Adobe to support Digital Restrictions Management

Richard Stallman

Richard Stallman

FSF condemns partnership between Mozilla and Adobe to support Digital Restrictions Management

BOSTON, Massachusetts, USA — Wednesday, May 14th, 2014 — In response to Mozilla’s announcement that it is reluctantly adopting DRM in its Firefox Web browser, Free Software Foundation executive director John Sullivan made the following statement:

“Only a week after the International Day Against DRM, Mozilla has announced that it will partner with proprietary software company Adobe to implement support for Web-based Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) in its Firefox browser, using Encrypted Media Extensions (EME).

The Free Software Foundation is deeply disappointed in Mozilla’s announcement. The decision compromises important principles in order to alleviate misguided fears about loss of browser marketshare. It allies Mozilla with a company hostile to the free software movement and to Mozilla’s own fundamental ideals.

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