Jon Ramer: Nashville Compassion Games

Jon Ramer

Jon Ramer

OK.  Day Two of the Compassion Games: Survival of the Kindest is happening and we have crossed into new territory.

Here is a beautiful example of how a community — Nashville — can embrace the Compassion Games to raise the spirit and commitment to compassion in action.  Check out the TV coverage, the theme song and how they are embracing putting compassion into action. This is a dream we share coming true. There are over 175 teams participating in this years games!
This challenges the Compassion Games in new ways —  be in appreciation and amplification of what these communities are doing…. people like Dina Capitani are the Compassion All-Stars that we serve….  please give this some thought…. building a platform like this opens up tremendous possibilities for collective impact.  What do you think about this?  Are you are working on Mission Two as a Secret Agent? Game on!
Jon

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Sep 13

Finn Jackson: Can Monasteries Be a Model for Reclaiming Tech Culture for Good?

Finn Jackson

Finn Jackson

This article describes an initiative more in line with the approach I would take:

“find a place with unmet needs and unused space to lend a building to a group of young hackers. Live together cheaply, building open-source infrastructure for the commons. Repeat until it becomes a network.”

Can Monasteries Be a Model for Reclaiming Tech Culture for Good?

Nathan Schneider

The Nation, 27 August 2014

hristian monasticism began in earnest in the fourth century CE, just after Constantine made Jesus Christ the official god of Rome. No longer persecuted, believers who craved a holiness less compromised by empire fled to the desert and set up communes. These monastics came to wield power in their own right, putting on display a more strenuous, radical faith. Their successors became Europe’s chief scholars and inventors and also served as guardians for the technology of writing.

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Sep 11

JZ Liskiewicz: Appropedia — Collaborative Sustainable Knowledge Sharing

Jason "JZ" Liszkiewicz

Jason “JZ” Liszkiewicz

Appropedia

Appropedia is for collaborative solutions
in sustainability, appropriate technology and poverty reduction.

Our vision and mission.

Contributors have made 274,988 edits and uploaded 21,269 files. Browse our categories or all 6,212 articles.

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Jun 24

Jean Lievens: The Social Labs Revolution

Jean Lievens

Jean Lievens

The Social Labs Revolution: A New Approach to Solving our Most Complex Challenges

The following is an excerpt from the introduction of the book, “What Are Social Laboratories?”

Zaid Hassan

Stanford Social Innovation Review, 19 May 2014

The Social Labs Revolution reports and builds on a decade of practical experiments in addressing social challenges that are complex in nature. These range from the sustainability of global food systems and child malnutrition to state collapse and climate change. Zaid Hassan, a co-founder of Reos Partners, makes the case that taking a planning-based approach risks almost certain failure. Instead he expounds on an experimental, prototyping based approach, social labs, that have proven more effective in addressing complex challenges.

The following is an excerpt from the book.

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May 20

Michel Bauwens: Transitioning to a Commons-Based Society

Michel Bauwens

Michel Bauwens

Transitioning to a Commons-Based Society

Background on the FLOK Project

Michel Bauwens:

The National Plan of Ecuador recognizes and stresses that the global transformation towards knowledge-based societies and economies requires a new form for the creation and distribution of value in society. The National Plan’s central concept is the achievement of ‘Buen Vivir’ (Sumak Kawsay) or ‘good living'; but good living is impossible without the availability of ‘good knowledge’, i.e. ‘Buen Conocer’ (‘Sumak Yachay’). The third national plan for 2013-2017 explicitly calls for a open-commons based knowledge society[1].

President Correa himself exhorted young people to achieve and fight for this open knowledge society[2].

The FLOK Society is a joint research effort by the Coordinating Ministry of Knowledge and Human Talent, the SENESCYT (Secretaría Nacional de Educación Superior, Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación) and the IAEN (Instituto de Altos Estudios del Estado) to develop transition and policy proposals to achieve such an open commons-based knowledge society.

FLOK refers to:

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May 19

Jean Lievens: YouTube – 14 Minutes with Michel Bauwens, Founder of Peer to Peer (P2P) Foundation

Jean Lievens

Jean Lievens

Truth and coherence are emphasized.

Michel Bauwens (Belgium) is a leading theorist on Peer to Peer (P2P) Economics. He is the founder of the Foundation for Peer-to-Peer Alternatives and works in collaboration with a global group of researchers in the exploration of peer production, governance, and property. He has been an analyst for the United States Information Agency, knowledge manager for British Petroleum (where he created one of the first virtual information centers), eBusiness Strategy Manager for Belgacom, as well as an internet entrepreneur in his home country of Belgium.

Layne Hartsell teaches at Sungkyunkwan University and lectures at Mahidol University. His research is in the philosophy of ethics and technology related to related to nanotech/piezotronics applications in undeveloped countries. He is a coordinator for Seoul Global Study Group, Cafe Chat

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May 18

Sepp Hasslberger: IndieBox Open Source Hardware Lets You Take Your Data Back from Google and Do CISCO-Like Rule-Making Without CISCO

Sepp Hasslberger

Sepp Hasslberger

We are finally seeing the de-centralized internet coming together.  Lots of people are working on this, both on software and hardware (like this computer/personal server) to make it a reality.

Out in the Open: The Tiny Box That Lets You Take Your Data Back From Google | Enterprise | WIRED

From www.wired.com May 14, 9:54 AM

For open source developer Johannes Ernst, what the world really needs is a simple device that anyone can use to take their data back from the wilds of the internet.

Click on Image to Enlarge

Click on Image to Enlarge

So he designed the Indie Box, a personal web server preloaded with open source software that lets you run your own web services from your home network–and run them with relative ease.

You can’t buy an Indie Box yet, but you can pre-order one through the crowdfunding site Indie GoGo.

The first Indie Box will run off an Intel Atom processor, 2GB of RAM, and two 1TB hard drives that mirror each other to help protect your data.

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May 15

Patrick Meier: Latest Findings on Disaster Resilience – From Burma to California via the Rockefeller Foundation

Patrick Meier

Patrick Meier

Latest Findings on Disaster Resilience: From Burma to California via the Rockefeller Foundation

I’ve long been interested in disaster resilience particularly when considered through the lens of self-organization. To be sure, the capacity to self-organize is an important feature of resilient societies. So what facilitates self-organization? There are several factors, of course, but the two I’m most interested in are social capital and communication technologies. My interest in disaster resilience also explains why one of our Social Innovation Tracks at QCRI is specifically focused on resilience. So I’m always on the lookout for new research on resilience. The purpose of this blog post is to summarize the latest insights.

Click on Image to Enlarge

Click on Image to Enlarge

This new report (PDF) on Burma assesses the influence of social capital on disaster resilience. More specifically, the report focuses on the influence of bonding, bridging and linking social capital on disaster resilience in remote rural communities in the Ayerwaddy Region of Myanmar. Bonding capital refers to ties that are shared between individuals with common characteristics characteristics such as religion or ethnicity. Bridging capital relates to ties that connect individuals with those outside their immediate communities. These ties could be the result of shared geographical space, for example. Linking capital refers to vertical links between a community and individuals or groups outside said community. The relationship between a village and the government or a donor and recipients, for example.

As the report notes, “a balance of bonding, bridging and linking capitals is important of social and economic stability as well as resilience. It will also play a large role in a community’s ability to reduce their risk of disaster and cope with external shocks as they play a role in resource management, sustainable livelihoods and coping strategies.” In fact, “social capital can be a substitute for a lack of government intervention in disaster planning, early warning and recovery.” The study also notes that “rural communities tend to have stronger social capital due to their geographical distance from government and decision-making structures necessitating them being more self-sufficient.”

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May 13

Graphic: City Resilience Framework

Click on Image to Enlarge

Click on Image to Enlarge

Source

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May 13

Tim Berners-Lee: Internet Magna Carta

Tim Berners-Lee

Tim Berners-Lee

We Need a Magna Carta for the Internet

Huffington Post, 6 May 2014

These comments are adapted from a talk to the Net Mundial conference in Brazil on May 4.

“Twenty-five years ago, when the Internet had been running for 20 years, there was internet mail and net news and remote login, but there was no web. No web sites, web pages, links. So I invented the World Wide Web. As the project grew, I needed collaborators. To achieve that, I went to the Internet technical community.

Specifically, I founded the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), a multistakeholder organization that develops open standards to ensure the long-term growth of the Web. W3C works on different aspects of Internet technology with numerous organizations, including the Internet Engineering Task Force, ECMA/TC39, IANA, and ICANN.

Hopefully you all agree that we have done a reasonable job. The Web, and its underlying Internet infrastructure, have been an enormous engine of growth and understanding for society. It has been the collaboration between these multi-stakeholder organizations which has made this possible.

Our technical community achieved this contribution with little oversight from governments. In fact, our “OpenStand” vision is that the right way to build a technical infrastructure for society is through multi-stakeholder technical groups where decisions are made in the public interest and based on technical merit. Discussion is open. Documents are available for free on the web. In W3C specifically, companies commit that as the standard emerges, they will not charge royalties to those who implement it.

The web needs to remain a system which exists without regard to national borders. Today most of the work is already done in the non-national Internet technical community. I was also pleased to hear that ICANN is beginning a dialogue to create a multi-stakeholder review process to replace that of the U.S. government. That is appropriate because ICANN services the global public interest.

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May 7