Review: Hacker Hoaxer Whistleblower Spy – The Many Faces of Anonymous

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Gabriella Coleman

Anonymous is almost certainly not what you think it is. You have to live it to understand it, its implications, its functioning, and its place in society. Gabrielle Coleman lived it, as a fully disclosed academic anthropologist. This is her story as much as theirs.

The structure of Anonymous is like the structure of the internet: multiple channels, multiple entry points, self healing patches, and lots of redundancy. (Also lots of swearing, lots of personal attacks, and lots of suspicions. Testosterone is involved.) This enables a totally flat organization to achieve in minutes what giant corporations and government take years to effect. The exhilaration, the joy, the satisfaction participants savor is incomparable. Anonymous is far more than a labor of love; it is idealists executing on their dreams. Everyone should be jealous.

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Feb 1

Review: ANOTHER French False Flag?

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Kevin Barnett

5 stars Nothing Is Ever What It Seems to Be — Question Authority!

NOTE: Since Look Inside the Book is not available, I have added the entire table of contents at the end of this review.

Disclosure: I have a chapter in this book, “Was Paris a False Flag,” in which I draw on my background as a CIA clandestine services officer with covert operations experience (false flags are a form of covert operation), as well as my extensive reading and reviews here at Amazon, where I read and review in 98 categories.

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Jan 10

Steven Aftergood: Domestic Role of US Military

Steven Aftergood

Steven Aftergood

The Domestic Role of the American Military

A rich and thoughtful account of how the U.S. military has protected, supported, clashed with and occasionally undermined constitutional government in this country is presented in the new book “Soldiers on the Home Front: The Domestic Role of the American Military” by William C. Banks and Stephen Dycus (Harvard University Press, 2016). The authors, who are law professors, trace the role of the military back to its constitutional roots, which are not as precisely defined as they might have been. The Framers of the Constitution “knew that troops would sometimes be needed to help enforce the civilian laws. They just neglected to tell us precisely when.” Read more.

 

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Jan 7

Review (Guest): The Devil’s Chessboard – Allen Dulles, the CIA, and the Rise of America’s Secret Government

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From the Shadows of the Cold War: the Rise of the CIA

Veteran journalist David Talbot, founder and former editor-in-chief of Salon, doesn’t skim over the surfaces of things. . . . Talbot’s new book, The Devil’s Chessboard: Allen Dulles, the CIA, and the Rise of America’s Secret Government, is equally essential reading, especially for readers with even a passing interest in post-WW2 U.S. foreign policy. The longest running director of the CIA (1952-1961), Dulles helped coordinate extremely bloody coups throughout the world. Not surprisingly, he comes off as a nasty piece of work.

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Dec 30