Steven Aftergood: Domestic Role of US Military

Steven Aftergood

Steven Aftergood

The Domestic Role of the American Military

A rich and thoughtful account of how the U.S. military has protected, supported, clashed with and occasionally undermined constitutional government in this country is presented in the new book “Soldiers on the Home Front: The Domestic Role of the American Military” by William C. Banks and Stephen Dycus (Harvard University Press, 2016). The authors, who are law professors, trace the role of the military back to its constitutional roots, which are not as precisely defined as they might have been. The Framers of the Constitution “knew that troops would sometimes be needed to help enforce the civilian laws. They just neglected to tell us precisely when.” Read more.

 

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Jan 7

Review (Guest): The Global Village Myth (Grand Strategy)

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Amazon Page

The Global Village Myth: Distance, War, and the Limits of Power

By Patrick Porter Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press, 2015

Reviewed by Steven Metz, Director of Research at the US Army War College

The Global Village Myth is short, tightly-argued body blow to contemporary American security policy. In it Patrick Porter takes on an important but often overlooked aspect of strategy-physical distance- and critiques the popular notion that technology has diminished its importance or even rendered it irrelevant. This is a seemingly simple idea with big implications.

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Nov 3

Worth a Look: National Security & Double Government

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Amazon Page

Michael J. Glennon

Why has U.S. security policy scarcely changed from the Bush to the Obama administration? National Security and Double Government offers a disquieting answer. Michael J. Glennon challenges the myth that U.S. security policy is still forged by America’s visible, “Madisonian institutions”–the President, Congress, and the courts. Their roles, he argues, have become largely illusory. Presidential control is now nominal, congressional oversight is dysfunctional, and judicial review is negligible.

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Sep 27