Review: Big Data, Little Data, No Data – Scholarship in the Networked World

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Amazon Page

Christine L. Borgman

5 Stars Major Contribution with Some Oversights

This book is extremely well-developed and and a major contribution, not least because it it one of the best explorations of information ecologies that are vastly more intricate and cover vastly more time, energy, and locational space, than most realize. It was recommended to me by Stephen E. Arnold, my most trusted IT advisor and author of the book not sold on Amazon, CyberOSINT: Next Generation Information Access.

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Sep 29

Worth a Look: Beyond Data Monitoring – Achieving the Sustainability Development Goals Through Intelligence (Decision-Support)

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Amazon Page

A bargain at 99 cents, with live links. 42 pages representing a lifetime of reflection and contributions from hundreds of other subject matter experts devoted to the idea that we can create a prosperous world at peace, a world that works for all.


As the United Nations (UN) contemplates its most important new economic and social initiative, the seventeen new Sustainability Development Goals (SDG), to be manifest in the Global Sustainable Development Report and related UN System activities, it is essential that the Secretary-General be afforded an opportunity to recognize the radical changes that are taking place in the external environment – and how the UN can capitalize on them to accelerate achievement of the SDGs.

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May 22

Review: London – the Information Capital: 100 Maps and Graphics That Will Change How You View the City

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Amazon Page

James Cheshire and Oliver Uberti

5.0 out of 5 stars From coffee table to scientific salon, a worthy offering, November 4, 2014

This is a spectacular offering on multiple fronts. On the low-end, it has got to be the coolest coffee table book around, something that could be usefully offered in every waiting room across London — and hopefully inspire copycats for other cities including Paris and New York and Dubai.

At the high end, the book offers the most current available understanding of just what can be gleaned from “big data” that is available from open databases — one can only imagine the additional value to be had from closed data bases (money movement, for example). And of course we have to persist in our demands that all data and the software and hardware needed to process the data be open source so that it is affordable, interoperable, and scalable.

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Nov 4