Jean Lievens: Sharing Economy Sucking Chest Wounds…

Jean Lievens

Jean Lievens

The Unbearable Loneliness Of The Sharing Economy

by Brian S Hall

August 25th, 2014

The sharing economy promises the potential for riches, personal empowerment, new modes of work, and fear, the kind of fear that swells from a livelihood dependent upon algorithms, star ratings, and the feedback of strangers.

When we imagined the future, certainly starting from the point when the smartphone was born, few of us expected a world where in-kind tips and real time number crunching might determine where we live, how well we ate, the size of our home, the composition of our dearest friends.

Of course, in a world where billions are virtually connected, all fighting over the same job, the same task, the same dollars to be made by sharing our rooms, our cars, our talents, can we have any real friends? Or does everyone morph into some 21st century amalgamation of customer-competitor?

The billions of dollars fueling Uber, Airbnb and the sharing economy appears to generate as much fear as it does potential, and rightly or no, the great minds and deep pockets of Silicon Valley are failing to address these fears.

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Aug 29

SchwartzReport: Market Basket — Board Fires Progressive CEO, Boomers Go on Strike to Reinstate — Mutuality Economics from the Bottom-Up

Stephan A. Schwartz

Stephan A. Schwartz

This is a lovely story of how capitalism could be run. It illustrates very clearly the difference between the vampire capitalism that dominates our economy, and the compassionate capitalism we could have.

Market Basket: The Return of Boomer Activism
LAUREN STILLER RIKLEEN – Forbes

Workers at the Market Basket supermarket chain just successfully undertook a high-risk job action with potentially historic repercussions. But this was more than just a fight for leadership control. It was also a story about boomers standing up for workplace values.

. . . . . . .

Arthur T. ran Market Basket with a straightforward and progressive management philosophy: treat its 25,000 employees (and customers) with respect and attention; promote from within; provide great pay and retirement benefits and continually invest in your staff. As a result, he developed an extraordinarily devoted workforce of people who grew up at the company and remained for decades and took great pride in making the stores so successful.

Over time, though, Arthur T.’s pension programs and above-market salaries were criticized by the board, who felt such generosity depressed shareholder dividends. On June 23, the board ultimately voted to remove Arthur T. as president.

The Employees Push to Bring Back Their Boss

That’s when the chain’s employees – many of them boomers – rose up in revolt. Some went on strike; others played key roles in protests including rallies attended by thousands.

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Aug 29

Rick Robinson: Smart Cities 101

Categories: Advanced Cyber/IO
Rick Robinson

Rick Robinson

7 steps to a Smart City

1. Define what a “Smarter City” means to you
2. Convene a stakeholder group to co-create a specific Smarter City vision; and establish governance and a credible decision-making process
3. Structure your approach to a Smart City by drawing on the available resources and expertise
4. Establish the policy framework
5. Populate a roadmap that can deliver the vision
6. Put the financing in place
7. Enable communities and engage with informality: how to make “Smarter” a self-sustaining process

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12 simple technologies for cities that are Smart, open and fair

So how do we design Smart City systems that employ technology to make cities more successful, resilient and efficient; in a way that distributes resources and creates opportunities more fairly than today?

One answer to that question is that the infrastructures and institutions of such cities should be open to citizens and businesses: accessible, understandable, adaptable and useful.

1.Broadband connectivity   .   2. Cloud computing   .   3. Mobile and Smart phones   .   4. Social media   .   5. The touchscreen   .   6. Open Source software   .   7. Intelligent hardware   .   8. Open APIs    .   9. Open Data   .   10. Open Standards   .   11. Local and virtual currencies and trading systems   .   12. Identity stores

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Aug 28

Berto Jongman: Investigative Journalism — A History and a Renaissance…

Categories: Ethics,Media
Berto Jongman

Berto Jongman

Tomgram: Anya Schiffrin, Who Knew We Were Living in the Golden Age of Investigative Journalism?

EXTRACT

The mass layoffs of older journalists around the world has had one benefit: there are plenty of experienced hands ready to train the next generation and provide institutional memory at innovative ventures. Some of these oldtimers, who aren’t busy teaching (or taking public relations jobs — but that’s a story for another time), are busy founding and running nonprofits dedicated to doing hard-driving, investigative reporting. These include: 100 Reporters, Global Journalism Investigative Network, Forum for African Investigative Reporters, Investigative Reporters and Editors, Investigative News Network, SCOOP, and the International  Consortium of Investigative Journalists. All of these organizations are benefitting from experienced editors and reporters downsized from traditional media outlets and committed to helping the next generation — and learning from them, too.

BOOKS Recommended:

Global Muckraking: 100 Years of Investigative Journalism from Around the World

The Jihadis Return: ISIS and the new Sunni Uprising

Undocumented: How Immigration Became Illegal

FICTION: Warburg in Rome

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Aug 28

John Maguire: Edgar Morin WISE 2013 Special Address YouTube (18:04) 7 Complex Lessons for Education

Focus on error and illusion, need to deal with uncertainty. A great deal of error arises from reductionism.

See Also:

2013 WISE Prize Laureate: YouTube (4:34) Vicky Colbert of Colombia on The New School for the Silent Revolution

2011 Edgar Morin on YouTube (12:23): Edgar Morin: Seven Complex Lessons in Education

Review: Homeland Earth

Review: Seven Complex Lessons for the Future

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Aug 28

Owl: CDC Cover-Up, Moral Degeneracy of Media & Government

Who?  Who?

Who? Who?

Latest News on CDC Vaccine-Autism Coverup

This is just the beginning. Much more will be emerging on this story in coming weeks and months. Because while the focus will be initially on how this fraud has so harmfully affected Afro-American children, it will inevitably open up questions on how vaccines affect all children and adults, questions which the vaccine industry, their government shills and media cheerleaders do not want to be raised because they know the answers will mean the end of the vaccine industry, not to mention ruin the credibility of the government and media shills. Karma is such a bitch to bastards.

3 major stories below the fold.

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Aug 28

Jean Lievens: Sharing Industry Insurance Challenges

Jean Lievens

Jean Lievens

How the sharing industry gets insurance

Sharing may sound utopian. But the sharing industry has a dark side and its name is insurance.

“Probably one of the hardest things we had to do in order to start our company was to get the insurance,” says Seth Peterson, co-founder and CEO of AllYouCanArcade.com, an arcade game rental business. Peterson says he had to call more than 100 insurance agents before he found one willing to work with him.

“Eventually what I did was I started to get my insurance license,” he says, “because I thought if no one is going to underwrite this, I’ll underwrite this myself.”

Peterson says the brokers he talked to were okay with the arcade game part of his business: “Then we would say, ‘Well, actually, though, we have these independent contractors who work for us, who fill demand across the entire United States.’ And that was the point where they just freaked out.”

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Aug 28

Stephen E. Arnold: Free Law Textbooks — and the Fight to Liberate Intellectual Property Law from Entrenched Corporations with Armed with Lobbyists

Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold

Free Law Textbooks Challenge Copyright Maximalism

August 28, 2014

The article titled Duke Professor Looking To Make Legal Texts Affordable; Kicking Off With Intellectual Property Law on Techdirt refers to the work of James Boyle and Jennifer Jenkins. Both work in the Center of the Study of Public Domain at Duke Law School and hoped to mitigate the prices of textbooks for college students. They have already released their Intellectual Property Statutory Supplement (free to download, about $10 to print). They are quoted in the article,

“We are motivated in part by the outrageously steep cost of legal teaching materials, (and the increasing restrictions on those materials — such as the removal of the right of first sale). This book is intended for use with our forthcoming Intellectual Property casebook (coming in the Fall) but can also be used as a free or low cost supplement for basic Intellectual Property courses — at the college, law school or graduate school levels.”

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Aug 28

SchwartzReport: 17,000 Police Agencies in the USA, All of Them Concealing How Many People — Generally Black — They Kill Each Year…

Stephan A. Schwartz

Stephan A. Schwartz

Today’s news brought yet more stories of police shootings of people whose only real crime seems to be being black. It made me wonder how many people are killed by the police each year. It turns out that is a very hard number to pin down. So I went looking to see if anyone had written something recently about this! . Here’s what I found. I was amazed to learn were have 17,000 different police agencies.

How Cops get Away With it: Why the Government can Read Your Emails, But Not Count Shooting Deaths
HEATHER DIGBY PARTON, Contributing Writer – Salon

Complete safety copy below the fold.

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Aug 28

Berto Jongman: RoboEarth, RoboBrain — ZERO True Cost Economics Included

Berto Jongman

Berto Jongman

Robotic brain ‘learns’ skills from the internet

A super-intelligent robotic “brain” that can learn new skills by browsing millions of web pages has been developed by US researchers. Robo Brain is designed to acquire a vast range of skills and knowledge from publicly available information sources such as YouTube. The information it learns can then be accessed by robots around the world, helping them to perform everyday tasks. A similar project is already being developed in Europe.

RoboEarth, described as a world wide web for robots, was demonstrated by researchers at Eindhoven University in the Netherlands in January. Like Robo Brain, it aims to become a global repository for information that can be accessed by other robots. But unlike RoboEarth, Robo Brain is able to build up its own understanding from the information it gets from the internet, rather than being programmed by humans.

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Aug 28