Review: Air Power in UN Operations – Wings for Peace

Tags:
Amazon Page

Amazon Page

Walter Dorn (editor) et al

5.0 out of 5 stars Pioneering Practical Work on Future of Aviation — Not Just UN — in Peace and War, August 29, 2014

This book — I disclose that my chapter is one of two concluding chapters — is one of the most practical, comprehensive, and perhaps — we all hope — inspirational books to be published on aviation applications for peace and war in recent memory. Since Look Inside the Book is not available, I will first list the parts and chapters, and then summarize my appreciation for this pioneering endeavor.

PART I THE UN’S FIRST “AIR FORCE”
01 Planning, Organizing, and Commanding Air Operations in the Congo, 1960
02 Peacekeepers in Combat: Fighter Jets and Bombers in the Congo, 1961-1963
03 A Fine Line: Use of Force, the Cold War, and Canada’s Air Support for the UN Organization in the Congo

PART II AIRLIFT: LIFELINE FOR UN MISSIONS
04 Above the Rooftop of the World: Canadian Air Operations in Kashmir and Along the India-Pakistan Border
05 Humanitarian Relief in Haiti, 2010: Honing the Partnership between the US Air Force and the UN
06 Flying Humanitarians: The UN Humanitarian Air Service

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off
Aug 29

Walter Dorn: Technology for Peacekeeping + PKI RECAP

Tags:
Click on Image to Enlarge

Click on Image to Enlarge

BRIEFING:  2013-05-29 Dorn Technology for Peace Operations

See Also:

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off
May 28

Review: Keeping Watch – Monitoring Technology and Innovation in UN Peace Operations

Tags:

Amazon Page

Walter Dorn

5.0 out of 5 stars Phenomenal Contribution to UN and to Literature,August 13, 2011

Professor Walter Dorn is the de facto dean of the small number of scholars who study the specific topic of peacekeeping intelligence, or intelligence support to United Nations (UN) operations. Since his pioneering early studies of UN successes in the Congo in the 1960’s to his more recent articles on the introduction of the Joint Military Analysis Centre (JMAC) in Haiti, he is both the closest academic observer, and the most well-written in this area.

I read this book with great interest. It is the first comprehensive look at technologies that are directly applicable to the fulfillment of UN mandates, the design and security of multinational forces, the effective management of tactical campaigns, and of course being technical, it is the first and last word on surveillance technologies vital to peacekeeping and peace enforcement across vast regions.

Pending the “Inside the Book” feature being available for this just published book, here is the table of contents from my own copy.

1 Introduction
2 The Evolution of Peacekeeping
3 Monitoring: The Constant Need
4 Survey of Technologies
5 Aerial Surveillance: Eye in the Sky
6 Traditional Peacekeeping: Cases
7 Modern Multidimensional Peacekeeping: Cases
8 Current UN Standards: Starting from Near Zero
9 Challenges and Problems
10 Recommendations
11 Conclusions

I recently attending a conference on the history and future of UN Air Power, and in both my own presentations and those of others, “Peace from Above” was a recurring theme. The importance of assuring that UN elements have the best possible human and technical surveillance technologies cannot be understated–for modest investments–including Unmanned Aerial Vehicles–the UN can save lives, money, and time–on the latter point, Colin Gray, in Modern Strategy, observes that time is the one strategic variable that can neither be purchased nor replaced.

A word on pricing: as those who follow my reviews know, I will occasionally single out extraordinary books that are so grotesquely priced as to dishonor the entire publishing world. This book is perfectly priced, close to my standard of page count with one decimal. I salute the UN Press for bringing this book into the world. It should become a standard volume, not only for UN training classes, but for all war colleges as well as for commercial security training and operations.

See Also:

Peacekeeping Intelligence: Emerging Concepts for the Future

Vote on Review

Comments Off
Aug 13

Reference: UN Air Power Conference Papers

Categories: Briefings (Core)
Tags:

Click on Image to Enlarge

The 17th Air Force Historical Workshop was a great success and the proceedings will be published in book form (scheduled for 2012).

For futher information, please contact Dr. Walter Dorn, Canadian Forces College, Toronto, at dorn@cfc.dnd.ca.

Presentations

Air Operations in Somalia, 1991-1993“,

Dr. William Dean III, United States Air Force Air Command and Staff College

Kinetic Air Power in the Congo, 1961-1963“,

Dr. Walter Dorn, Royal Military College / Canadian Forces College

Attack Helicopters in the Heart of Africa, 2004 onward“,

Dr. Walter Dorn, Royal Military College / Canadian Forces College

United Nations Air Operations in the Congo Crisis, 1960 – 1964“,

Dr. Sebastian Lukasik, United States Air Force Air Command and Staff College
Comments Off
Aug 2

Graphics Directory (List & Small Images)

Categories: AA Graphics List
Tags: ,

Below the line….alpha list of all graphics [in English] with embedded links. For Spanish-language graphics see AA Lista de Graficas (1) and [in reverse order as posted] AA Espanol (55).  Updated 2 Aug 2013.

Click on the Link Above the Image to Reach Full Size Image, Comments, & Source Link

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off
Jul 15

Search: dr walterdorn intelligence united nations

Categories: Searches
Tags:

Simplicity matters.  It also helps to not run on the name.  Generally everything on this site bears on intelligence so that is a useless search term in this special context.

Search 1:  Walter Dorn (16 Posts)

Search 2:  United Nations intelligence (over 100 hits most not directly related)

Search 3:  United Nations (over 100 hits slightly more focused)

See Also:

Dorn (under Top Authors Less Steele)

M4IS2

Comments Off
Jun 20

Worth a Look: Keeping Watch (UN Surveillance)

Categories: Worth A Look
Tags:

Click on Image to Enlarge

Amazon Pre-Order Page (Moves in August not December, Amazon Page Has Not Been Properly Set Up By Publisher).

Knowledge is power. In the hands of the UN peacekeepers it can be a power for peace.  Lacking knowledge, peacekeepers often find themselves powerless in the field, unable to protect themselves and others.  The United Nations owes it to both its peacekeepers and the “peacekept” to utilize modern tools to make its monitoring effective for conflict prevention and resolution.

Keeping Watch explains how modern technologies can increase the range, efficiency and accuracy of UN observation.  Satellites, aircraft and ground sensors enable surveillance of large areas over long periods.  They can provide imagery of hot spots for use as evidence in human rights investigations. Sensors can be the extended “eyes” of UN patrols, humanitarian convoys and robust UN operations.  Fortunately, commercial technologies have been increasing exponentially in capability while decreasing rapidly in cost.  The United Nations, however, continues to use technologies and techniques from decades past.

This book identifies the benefits and pitfalls of specific technologies.  The few cases of technologies effectively harnessed in the field are showcased, and creative recommendations are offered to overcome the institutional inertia and widespread misunderstandings about how technology can complement human initiative in the quest for peace in war-torn lands.

A. Walter Dorn teaches military officers and civilians at the Canadian Forces College (CFC) and at the Royal Military College of Canada. He is a professor of defence studies and Chair of the Department of Security and International Affairs at CFC. He has both studied and served on UN peace operations, and worked as a consultant to the UN’s Department of Peacekeeping Operations.

Comments Off
Jun 20